a sign on the grass: San Felipe Street 5555 outside address stand with Marathon Oil Tower tenants on February 2016 in Houston, United States.


© Source: Valentin Martynov/Shutterstock.com
San Felipe Street 5555 outside address stand with Marathon Oil Tower tenants on February 2016 in Houston, United States.

Let’s face it. Oil companies in the United States are suffering, and they have been for much of the year. Marathon Oil (NYSE:MRO) is no different and shares of MRO stock have taken up residence in Penny Stock Land.



a sign in front of a tree: San Felipe Street 5555 outside address stand with Marathon Oil Tower tenants on February 2016 in Houston, United States.


© Provided by InvestorPlace
San Felipe Street 5555 outside address stand with Marathon Oil Tower tenants on February 2016 in Houston, United States.

Oil – black Gold – Texas tea – is kind of on the ropes, thanks to a combination of events.

Paramount among these events is the novel coronavirus. The pandemic spawned by Covid-19 has devastated the global economy. Almost any company associated with the travel industry, from airlines to hotel owners to oil companies, has nearly been crushed by the rapid and intense economic slowdown.

Consumers dramatically altered their lives in response to the pandemic. They stayed home (and shopped online). Trips were canceled. Airplanes were parked because travelers were few. And layoffs and business closures have been legion.

One ripple effect has been a sharp drop in the demand for oil. As a result, prices for the historic commodity have fluctuated widely. The volatility has been impressive. It wasn’t that long ago that the price of oil was actually a negative number, a numerical oddity that stunned many investors with a clear indication that this was not a normal situation.

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What About MRO Stock?

The Houston-based energy firm, which has a market cap of about $3.46 billion, can trace its roots to 1887 and Standard Oil, taking twists and turns over the century-plus to even be a part of United States Steel.

Few people would describe Marathon Oil as a

OPEC expects the number of cars on the roads in India to jump by more than five times by 2045 and, along with a similar increase in China, be one of the major drivers of rising oil demand


XAVIER GALIANA

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The coronavirus crisis has sparked talk that the world might have reached peak oil demand but the OPEC cartel sees crude consumption continuing to grow during the next quarter century, driven in large part by greater use of cars in developing countries.

In its latest forecasts, released Thursday, OPEC sees surprisingly little long-term impact despite the coronavirus pandemic plunging the global economy and oil demand into a tailspin.

While the pace of economic recovery will dictate how fast oil consumption rebounds, even OPEC’s scenario of a slow healing sees an eventual return to increased demand.

“At the global level, oil demand is expected to increase by almost 10 mbd (million barrels per day) over the long-term, rising from 99.7 mbd in 2019 to… 109.1 mbd in 2045,” the cartel said in its latest World Oil Outlook.

This baseline scenario represents 9.4 percent growth from pre-coronavirus consumption levels.

Under its slow growth scenario, OPEC expects 5.0 percent growth in oil demand.

And even with fast adoption of green technologies and tougher climate change policies, the cartel still sees a 3.1 percent increase in consumption.

OPEC’s forecast contrasts with that of some industry players, including major oil firms such as BP, which in its latest long-term estimates predicted that oil demand had already peaked or would soon do so thanks to increased use of renewable energy and the impact of the coronavirus.

Yet even the cartel’s forecasts reveal the impact of the changes already underway in certain regions.

It sees oil demand as having

DALLAS — Working from home has become more than a way to get through the pandemic.

It’s now a favored perk for some employees and a necessary lifestyle for others. For some companies, it’s also become a powerful recruiting tool.

AmeriSave Mortgage Corp. has been hiring people from around the country to report to the office in Plano, Texas. By leading with the opportunity to work remotely, it’s attracted a flood of candidates even while raising the qualifications to apply.

“I jumped on it because I’ve known about the opportunities at AmeriSave, and I didn’t want to leave my family in Nebraska,” said Noah Peters, who worked for the city of Omaha before becoming a work-from-home loan originator in July. “I’m an in-person kind of guy, but this was pretty seamless. I love what I’m doing and I’m happy I made the change.”

Bottle Rocket, a technology firm based in Addison, Texas, adopted a “work from everywhere” policy early in the pandemic and said it was permanent. That caught the attention of three former employees in Seattle, Austin and California, and the company quickly rehired them.

“These are very valuable hires who have the institutional memory of our culture and processes,” Bottle Rocket founder and CEO Calvin Carter said. “They were up and running instantly.”

The new policy has also helped attract diverse candidates from the Dallas-Fort Worth area, Carter said. These were folks who weren’t willing to make a long daily drive to the headquarters in Addison.

“These are benefits we didn’t see coming,” Carter said. “It makes us more competitive in the human capital wars.”

But work from home doesn’t work for a lot of people. Many don’t have the right computer, software, broadband and training. Other jobs, such as serving food at a restaurant or performing surgery

LONDON (Reuters) – British Prime Minister Boris Johnson does not particularly wish for the Brexit transition period to end without a new trade deal in place but believes that Britain could live with such an outcome, he said on Sunday.

With the Dec. 31 expiry of the transition period fast approaching, Johnson and the head of the EU’s executive, Ursula von der Leyen, agreed in a phone call on Saturday to step up negotiations on a post-Brexit deal.

“I think it’s there to be done,” Johnson said during an interview on BBC television.

“Alas, there are some difficult issues that need to be fixed, and there’s no question that the EU needs to understand that we’re utterly serious about needing to control our own laws and our own regulations, and similarly they need to understand that the repatriation of the UK’s fisheries … is very important.”

Asked whether he was worried about the potential impact of a no-deal situation in the middle of the COVID pandemic, Johnson said: “I don’t want the Australian WTO-type outcome, particularly, but we can more than live with it.

“I think the people of this country have had enough … of being told that this will be impossible or intolerable. I think we can prosper mightily under those circumstances.”

The government last week told importers and exporters they would have to complete extra paperwork whether there was a deal or not and that a lack of preparation on their part could lead to 100 km queues of trucks.

That prompted accusations from the opposition that ministers were setting up industry to take the blame for any chaos that might follow a botched Brexit.

The EU says that any deal must be sealed by the end of October, or in the first days of November at

LONDON (Reuters) – British Prime Minister Boris Johnson does not particularly wish for the Brexit transition period to end without a new trade deal in place but believes that Britain could live with such an outcome, he said on Sunday.

With the Dec. 31 expiry of the transition period fast approaching, Johnson and the head of the EU’s executive, Ursula von der Leyen, agreed in a phone call on Saturday to step up negotiations on a post-Brexit deal.

“I think it’s there to be done,” Johnson said during an interview on BBC television.

“Alas, there are some difficult issues that need to be fixed, and there’s no question that the EU needs to understand that we’re utterly serious about needing to control our own laws and our own regulations, and similarly they need to understand that the repatriation of the UK’s fisheries … is very important.”

Asked whether he was worried about the potential impact of a no-deal situation in the middle of the COVID pandemic, Johnson said: “I don’t want the Australian WTO-type outcome, particularly, but we can more than live with it.

“I think the people of this country have had enough … of being told that this will be impossible or intolerable. I think we can prosper mightily under those circumstances.”

The government last week told importers and exporters they would have to complete extra paperwork whether there was a deal or not and that a lack of preparation on their part could lead to 100 km queues of trucks.

That prompted accusations from the opposition that ministers were setting up industry to take the blame for any chaos that might follow a botched Brexit.

The EU says that any deal must be sealed by the end of October, or in the first days of November at