a small house in a body of water: John M Lund Photography Inc / Getty Images


© John M Lund Photography Inc / Getty Images
John M Lund Photography Inc / Getty Images

  • Jennifer Taub is a legal scholar and advocate who’s testified as a banking law expert before Congress and appeared on MSNBC and CNN. 
  • The following is an excerpt from her new book, “BIG DIRTY MONEY: The Shocking Injustice And Unseen Cost of White Collar Crime.”
  • In it, she examines white collar crime, its history, and why these offenders fail to face the consequences that street level criminals do from Congress and the Supreme Court.
  • She explains how the country’s biggest crimes — like the financial crisis in 2008 to the ongoing opioid epidemic — have taken a toll in its citizens on a systematic level and the US can do better moving forward. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

America, we have a big dirty money problem.

The corporate crime, elite impunity, and public corruption disease did not infect us overnight, though. We’ve been exposed now for so very long that we are almost immune. Almost.

If you still get angry when you see prosperous predators get away with it, we still have a chance to fight back. I’m ready to speak up about what’s broken and promote specific, significant, and enduring fixes. At the end of this chapter, following these proposed solutions, I’ll explain why and how you can join this effort.

You don’t need a law degree or a lobbyist’s contact list to exert influence. There are more honest people in America who believe that when we get big money out of politics and when big businesses and the elite are made to obey the law, we are all safer and our society is more just. 



text: "BIG DIRTY MONEY: The Shocking Injustice And Unseen Cost of White Collar Crime," By Jennifer Taub. Courtesy of Penguin Random House


© Courtesy of Penguin Random House
“BIG DIRTY MONEY: The Shocking Injustice And Unseen

(Bloomberg) — The U.K. reached a 9.8 million pound ($12.7 million) settlement in its first successful use of a controversial power designed to crack down on dirty money.



a sign on the side of a building: LONDON, ENGLAND - OCTOBER 07: A general view of The National Crime Agency building in Westminster on October 7, 2013 in London, England. The NCA replaces SOCA, the Serious Organised Crime Agency, which was formed in 2006. Dubbed "the British FBI", the NCA will be tasked with tackling the most serious of crimes in the UK and replaces a number of existing bodies. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)


© Photographer: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images Europe
LONDON, ENGLAND – OCTOBER 07: A general view of The National Crime Agency building in Westminster on October 7, 2013 in London, England. The NCA replaces SOCA, the Serious Organised Crime Agency, which was formed in 2006. Dubbed “the British FBI”, the NCA will be tasked with tackling the most serious of crimes in the UK and replaces a number of existing bodies. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

The National Crime Agency settled a so-called Unexplained Wealth Order with Mansoor “Manni” Mahmood Hussain, a Leeds businessman, the agency said Wednesday in a statement. The 40-year-old handed over more than 45 properties in London, Leeds and Cheshire, four parcels of land, and nearly 600,000 pounds in cash. The London properties include two apartments in the tony Knightsbridge neighborhood.

“This case is a milestone, demonstrating the power of Unexplained Wealth Orders, with significant implications for how we pursue illicit finance in the U.K,” Graeme Biggar, the NCA’s director general of the National Economic Crime Centre, said in a statement.

Hussain didn’t respond to several messages left with his business. The NCA accused him of using blackmail, threats of violence and ties to criminals to build his property portfolio.

The British government introduced UWOs two years ago to help stop a growing problem of criminals and dictators using the country to hide their wealth. The civil litigation tool forces people with assets of more than 50,000 pounds to prove their funds come from legitimate sources. Failure to comply with the order can allow a court to freeze the assets.

In July, a parliamentary report on Russian involvement in

This post was contributed by a community member. The views expressed here are the author’s own.

Brackpool, Koziatek, and Villaraigosa
Brackpool, Koziatek, and Villaraigosa ( Cadiz, Marilyn Koziatek for School Board 2020 and Antonio for California)

Greed, for lack of a better word, is good.”
– Wall Street

If you have ever wondered how a career politician like Antonio Villaraigosa supports himself between political offices, the answer lies with people like Keith Brackpool. The former Los Angeles mayor depends on this benefactor not only for contributions “to his political campaigns”, but for a “job between electoral posts”. Looking at the source of this money provides insight into why the corporate wing of the Democratic party has lost its way.

Born in England, Brackpool “came to the US after admitting having breached financial disclosure laws in the UK in the 1980s.” In the United States, he has made millions from Cadiz, a company that he founded that as of 2015 had never “had a profitable year”. Using plans opposed by “environmentalists, local ranchers, protectionists, and Native American tribes”, the company seeks to make billions of dollars in profits from selling groundwater from places like the Mohave Desert to thirsty California cities. However, in order to do so, it needs to bypass environmental review. Despite the legal payoff of politicians like Villaraigosa, it has not been able to do so.

Proving that she will take money from anyone who offers it, LAUSD School Board candidate Marilyn Koziatek is the latest politician to benefit from the generosity of Brackpool. He joins Jim Walton and other members of the 1% who are supporting her candidacy in an attempt to privatize our public education system. If they are successful, our students will become commoditized sources of profit, just like the groundwater in the Mojave.

“The most valuable


If you’re looking for a self-improvement task in this pandemic era, try teaching yourself to use contactless payments with your phone or “tap-to-pay” credit and debit cards.

Any germaphobe will tell you that the surfaces of bills and coins have always been gross. And handing your credit card to a cashier who has the sniffles and a hacking cough? Even in pre-pandemic times, also gross.


Now, COVID-19 has prompted the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to advise using touchless payments whenever possible in the brick-and-mortar world.

Americans have been relatively slow to adopt touch-free

If you’re looking for a self-improvement task in this pandemic era, try teaching yourself to use contactless payments with your phone or “tap-to-pay” credit and debit cards.



FILE - This Oct. 8, 2019 file photo shows the Apple Pay app on an iPhone in New York. Using contactless payments for in-person retail transactions offers convenience and security benefits, but amid the coronavirus pandemic, hygiene might be the best reason yet. “Contactless” usually means tap-to-pay credit and debit cards, smartphone digital wallets or retailer apps. (AP Photo/Jenny Kane, File)


© Provided by Associated Press
FILE – This Oct. 8, 2019 file photo shows the Apple Pay app on an iPhone in New York. Using contactless payments for in-person retail transactions offers convenience and security benefits, but amid the coronavirus pandemic, hygiene might be the best reason yet. “Contactless” usually means tap-to-pay credit and debit cards, smartphone digital wallets or retailer apps. (AP Photo/Jenny Kane, File)

Any germaphobe will tell you that the surfaces of bills and coins have always been gross. And handing your credit card to a cashier who has the sniffles and a hacking cough? Even in pre-pandemic times, also gross.

Loading...

Load Error

Now, COVID-19 has prompted the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to advise using touchless payments whenever possible in the brick-and-mortar world.

Americans have been relatively slow to adopt touch-free payments even though they’re more convenient and secure than swiping credit and debit cards. But maybe hygiene will be the tipping point as people seek a solution for, well, yucky money.

“I think the pandemic is a strong impetus to change,” said Jodie Kelley, CEO of the Electronic Transactions Association. “I think it’s going to stick and accelerate further. As people get used to it and understand how to do it and find that it’s simple and convenient, then they’re not going to shift back.”

Consumer interest in contactless payments has spiked during the pandemic.

Since January, no-touch payments have increased at 69% of retailers surveyed by the research firm Forrester on behalf of the National Retail Federation. And two-thirds of retailers surveyed now accept some form of no-touch payment.

Learning to use contactless payments might be