An international investment firm now owns an industrial park at DFW International Airport.

New York-based Brookfield Properties acquired the three-building Passport Logistics Center.

The 1.2 million-square-foot warehouse and distribution complex was developed by Dalfen Industrial, which has headquarters offices in Dallas and Canada. The buildings are at the south end of the airport near Airport Freeway and are part of the airport’s mixed-use Passport Park development.

Dalfen built the Passport Logistics Center in partnership with Brookfield, which now is the full owner of the business park.

“With the project’s prime location and best-in-class functionality, Brookfield Properties leased 50% of the project during construction,” Brookfield Properties officials said in a statement. “Over the past three years, Brookfield Properties has increased its footprint in the Metroplex, adding over 5.5 million square feet across nine transactions.”

During the last year, Brookfield has added more than $1.2 billion in logistics properties in the U.S.

North Texas warehouse construction is barely keeping up with demand.

Dalfen Industrial in turn has bought five industrial buildings in Fort Worth and San Antonio.

In Fort Worth, Dalfen acquired the new Mark IV Commerce Center, a three-building, more than 1 million-square-foot industrial park at Interstate 35W and Interstate 820. The buildings were developed by Crow Holdings Industrial.

Dalfen also purchased two industrial buildings north of San Antonio off Interstate 35.

“Best-in-class properties in exceptional infill locations make these acquisitions a natural fit for our rapidly growing portfolio,” Sean Dalfen, president and chief investment officer of Dalfen Industrial, said in a statement.

Dalfen Industrial now owns more than 4 million square feet of industrial buildings in Texas.

Dalfen Industrial bought the Mark IV Commerce Center in North Fort Worth.
Dalfen Industrial bought the Mark IV Commerce Center in North Fort Worth.(Dalfen Industrial )

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Fueled by increased consumer product demands during the pandemic, Dallas-Fort Worth industrial building leasing set a record in the first nine months of 2020.

Warehouse and distribution tenants have gobbled up 21 million square feet of industrial space in North Texas through September.

Almost 5 million square feet of net leasing was recorded just in the third quarter, according to a new report from commercial real estate firm Cushman & Wakefield.

“The Dallas-Fort Worth industrial market continues to perform extremely well,” Cushman & Wakefield executive managing director Nathan Orbin said. “Even as concerns over the pandemic and an upcoming presidential election exist, demand remained strong,

“We anticipate demand to remain elevated as we are currently tracking over 14 million square feet of active tenant requirements.”

Expanding e-commerce and consumer products firms are driving the demand for North Texas warehouse space.

In the third quarter, some of the biggest leases were by Uline, a Wisconsin-based distributor of shipping, industrial and packaging materials that took 1.6 million square feet of space at DFW International Airport, and Amazon, which leased another 1 million square feet in southern Dallas. Encore Wire Corp added 724,380 square feet of distribution space in McKinney.

“E-commerce and the increasing demand for industrial product is driving the D-FW industrial market,” said Kurt Griffin, Cushman & Wakefield executive managing director. “D-FW has delivered close to 23 million square feet of industrial product year to date with another 24 million square feet under construction.

“However, tenant leasing is keeping up with new supply, maintaining a below historical level vacancy, which currently sits at 6.5%.”

Most of the ongoing industrial development is in southern Dallas County, in the AllianceTexas development area of North Fort Worth, at DFW International Airport and in South Fort Worth.

More than 23 million square feet of warehouse space is under construction in North Texas.
More than 23 million square feet of warehouse

Nasdaq Inc. is in talks with Texas Gov. Greg Abbott about potentially relocating the exchange’s electronic trading systems from New Jersey to Dallas-Fort Worth, according to two sources familiar with the discussions.

Other trading exchanges also could be involved in the discussions, both sources said.

Nasdaq is planning a visit to Texas to meet with the governor, according to one of the sources. Leaders of the exchange have had “a great dialogue” with Abbott, the source said.

The exchange, which lists about 176 Texas companies and has 87 employees in the state, is intrigued by an opportunity touted by Abbott to power its electronic infrastructure with renewable energy from wind farms in the state, according to one of the sources. Nasdaq is the trading platform for many of the nation’s environmentally conscious companies.

When Facebook invested $1 billion in building its massive data center at AllianceTexas north of Fort Worth, it struck a deal to buy its electricity from a 17,000-acre wind farm under construction at the time. Facebook, which trades on Nasdaq, is now planning to add to its 150-acre campus, which opened in 2017.

Dallas-Fort Worth isn’t alone in wooing the stock exchanges. Officials in Virginia, North Carolina and Illinois have also had discussions with Nasdaq, one of the sources said.

In a statement to The Dallas Morning News, Nasdaq vice president of communications Joe Christinat said: “We are assessing all options, but our No. 1 priority is protecting the U.S. capital markets and its investors.”

A spokesman for the New York Stock Exchange’s parent company, the Intercontinental Exchange, couldn’t be immediately reached for comment.

A potential tax on financial transactions in New Jersey, where Nasdaq and other exchanges house the data systems that power Wall Street’s daily trades, is what’s driving the talks.

NYSE, Nasdaq and

Earlier this month, WiNGS announced Tameka Cass as the organization’s new chief development officer. In January, Kate Rose Marquez became chief executive officer. The 112-year-old nonprofit provides a range critical resources for women in need, including those who are first-time mothers and small business owners. It focuses on vulnerable populations such as communities of color and those with limited English proficiency, single-income households, and women at risk of intimate-partner violence and financial insecurity.

With Cass new to the nonprofit and Marquez nearly nine months into her role — which has held challenges she didn’t bargain for — we asked the women a few questions about the ongoing impact WiNGS has on women in Dallas-Fort Worth, how it’s managed through the pandemic and what 2021 might hold.

FWD>DFW: Tameka, as the new chief development officer, what’s the first big thing you want to accomplish? What do you see as the biggest hurdle to accomplishing that?

TC: The first big thing I want to accomplish is increased awareness of WiNGS and the impact our services provide to women and families, specifically women of color, in our community. The global pandemic exposed the layers of inequities that exist for women and their families. My goal is to focus on ways to address the increased need for support and resources through our fund development strategies. Like many nonprofits, WiNGS has been impacted by the shift in funding from the philanthropic community, as they respond to the growing needs of nonprofits providing critical services to the community.

My biggest hurdle to accomplishing these goals is identifying creative ways to meet the growing needs of the women we serve with so much uncertainty about the future.

FWD>DFW: Give us a specific example of a woman whose life has been deeply impacted for the better in 2020.