(Reuters) – Equitrans Midstream Corp said on Monday it will evaluate the cost and timing of the completion of the Mountain Valley natural gas pipeline based on ongoing litigation and upcoming federal approvals.

FILE PHOTO: An aerial view of the under-construction Mountain Valley Pipeline near Blacksburg, Virginia, U.S. September 30, 2019. REUTERS/Charles Mostoller

The U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) gave Mountain Valley permission late Friday to resume some construction on its $5.4 billion-$5.7 billion pipeline, which runs from Virginia to West Virginia.

“As the litigation process progresses and as we receive additional information from FERC regarding potentially releasing the remainder of the route for construction, (Mountain Valley) will continue to evaluate its current construction plans, budget, and schedule,” Equitrans said.

Mountain Valley is one of several U.S. oil and gas pipelines delayed by regulatory and legal fights with environmental and local groups that found problems with federal permits issued by the Trump administration.

FERC suspended work on Mountain Valley a year ago due to litigation over the project’s Biological Opinion from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), which allows construction in areas inhabited by endangered and threatened species.

The FWS issued a new Biological Opinion in early September. Environmental and other groups continue to challenge the latest FWS approval and other federal permits in court.

Analysts at Height Capital Markets said they expect the project to enter service in mid 2021 but noted timing could slip to the third quarter of 2021 if legal challenges prevent some stream crossings.

“We acknowledge the legal challenge that is currently before Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals and have agreed to temporarily delay stream and waterbody activities out of respect for that process,” Equitrans said.

Equitrans has said it expects the pipeline, which is about 92% complete, to enter service in early

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The Center for Disease Control reports that suicide rates have increased by 35% since 1999 and that suicide is the No. 10 cause of death in America.

Some people might think that life insurance policies don’t cover death is by suicide. However, most life insurance policies have what’s called a suicide clause: If the policyholder dies by suicide within the first two years of the policy, then the insurance will not give beneficiaries the death benefit. If the death occurs after the two-year period, beneficiaries receive the death benefit.

Unfortunately, that doesn’t mean the process is uncomplicated. If the policyholder failed to disclose mental illness on their insurance application, the death benefit might be withheld.

What is life insurance?

Life insurance is a contract between you and the life insurance company, where you pay premiums (monthly or annually) for a payout that your living relatives will receive upon your death, known as the death benefit. Should you die, the insurance company pays the death benefit to your chosen beneficiary.

There are two types of life insurance: whole (permanent) life and term life. Either can require a medical exam as part of the approval process known as underwriting.

People with certain pre-existing health conditions may be ineligible for traditional life insurance. Therefore, they get no medical exam life insurance. Although there is no medical exam, there is usually a health questionnaire. Failure to disclose certain conditions could result in your beneficiaries not receiving the death benefit. 

Mental illness addressed in the suicide clause

Insurance providers will ask if you ever had