Video: Obscure far-right group becomes global name (Sky News)

Obscure far-right group becomes global name

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Impending death, as the saying goes, has a way of focusing the mind. There’s no reason to believe President Trump faces imminent death as a result of his recently testing positive for the coronavirus.



a person sitting in a car: Photograph: Joshua Roberts/Reuters


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Joshua Roberts/Reuters

But the brief video he released before he went into hospital showed a Trump we’ve rarely seen before: sombre, scared and, perhaps for the first time, truly shaken by the pandemic’s threat to both the nation and himself. It’s conceivable that this momentous new development in the US presidential race, just a month from election day, could restore a seriousness to our politics that it has lacked for quite a while.

Exhibit A in the unseriousness of American political life has, of course, been our tragically inept response to the pandemic. Not all of the blame can be pinned on the Trump administration. The coronavirus has demonstrated a widespread breakdown in national competence that has become increasingly evident since the end of the cold war, which likely will receive further confirmation when we prove ourselves incapable of conducting a successful election next month.



a man wearing a suit and tie: President Trump arrives at a hospital in Bethesda, Maryland.


© Photograph: Joshua Roberts/Reuters
President Trump arrives at a hospital in Bethesda, Maryland.

Trump’s opponents have some justification for considering his contracting the coronavirus to be karmic retribution

But Trump’s distinctive contribution to our cack-handed response to this pandemic has been to politicise the public health measures to combat it. His irresponsible pursuit of partisan advantage over the national interest led him to downplay the threat of the virus, to demand a premature return to business as usual, to ignore social distancing at his public rallies and to mock wearing a mask as somehow weak

Impending death, as the saying goes, has a way of focusing the mind. There’s no reason to believe President Trump faces imminent death as a result of his recently testing positive for the coronavirus.

But the brief video he released before he went into hospital showed a Trump we’ve rarely seen before: sombre, scared and, perhaps for the first time, truly shaken by the pandemic’s threat to both the nation and himself. It’s conceivable that this momentous new development in the US presidential race, just a month from election day, could restore a seriousness to our politics that it has lacked for quite a while.

Exhibit A in the unseriousness of American political life has, of course, been our tragically inept response to the pandemic. Not all of the blame can be pinned on the Trump administration. The coronavirus has demonstrated a widespread breakdown in national competence that has become increasingly evident since the end of the cold war, which likely will receive further confirmation when we prove ourselves incapable of conducting a successful election next month.

But Trump’s distinctive contribution to our cack-handed response to this pandemic has been to politicise the public health measures to combat it. His irresponsible pursuit of partisan advantage over the national interest led him to downplay the threat of the virus, to demand a premature return to business as usual, to ignore social distancing at his public rallies and to mock wearing a mask as somehow weak and un-American.

Trump’s opponents have some justification for considering his contracting the coronavirus to be a kind of karmic retribution. Bu fortunately, most prominent Democrats and Never Trumpers understand that the presidency as an institution, as opposed to any particular

Transportation firm Uber Technologies is looking for someone to take over five floors of its office space in Deep Ellum.



a large building with a mountain in the background: Uber is hunting someone to take over its lease of five floors in the Epic office tower just east of downtown Dallas.


© Smiley N. Pool/Staff Photographer/The Dallas Morning News/TNS
Uber is hunting someone to take over its lease of five floors in the Epic office tower just east of downtown Dallas.

The almost 116,000-square-foot sublease in the Epic office tower on Pacific Avenue is just the latest case of companies looking to fill surplus office space during the pandemic.

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Commercial property firm CBRE is marketing ride-hailing firm Uber offices on the eastern edge of downtown Dallas.

Uber opened its Dallas office in the Epic tower last year. At the same time, it announced it was taking an even bigger space in another office tower under construction next door.

Real estate information firm CoStar first reported that Uber is now seeking to sublease.

The five floors of office space in the building at 2550 Pacific Avenue are available through mid 2023, according to CBRE.

The Uber space for lease includes offices, conference facilities, training rooms and lounge areas on the ninth through 15th floors, according to CBRE’s marketing material.

The move to sublease its Deep Ellum offices is the second change Uber has made this year for its planned Dallas regional operation.

In the summer of 2019 the California-based transportation company said it would open a Dallas office with at least 3,000 workers.

The planned Deep Ellum operation was to have been Uber’s largest hub outside of its San Francisco headquarters.

In November Uber and developers KDC and Westdale Real Estate broke ground on a 23-story, 470,000-square-foot office tower to house thousands of Uber workers starting in late 2022.

The Epic office high-rise is still under construction.

But Uber earlier this year said that it was pausing hiring for the