Insurers have confirmed that pledges to support people working from home due to coronavirus and motorists whose habits have also changed because of the pandemic will last until at least the end of this year.

he Association of British Insurers (ABI) said the extra support already in place, which was due to expire at the end of October, has been extended until December 31 2020.

The ABI said this could be of significant help to many of the UK’s 17 million home insurance policyholders and 27 million motor insurance customers.

Under the temporary support measures, if someone is an office-based worker who is working from home because of the pandemic, their home insurance will not be affected. They do not need to contact their insurer to update their documents or extend their cover.

And if someone has to drive to and from their workplace because of the impact of Covid-19, their insurance policy will not be affected, the ABI said.

Also, if someone is using their own car for voluntary purposes to transport medicines or groceries to support others who are impacted by Covid-19, their cover will not be affected.

This applies to all categories of NHS volunteer responders, including transporting patients, equipment, or other essential supplies.

If someone’s work is critical to the national response to Covid-19 and they need to use their own car to drive to different locations for work purposes because of the impact of coronavirus, their cover will also not be affected.

The temporary pledges remain under review, and the next review of home and motor insurance will take place before December 31.

The ABI said that if policyholders have longer-term changes in their working-at-home or driving patterns that will continue into the next 12 months and they are renewing their insurance policy, they should

By Steven Scheer and Ari Rabinovitch

JERUSALEM (Reuters) – Israel’s finance minister promised on Sunday the long awaited 2021 state budget would be ready in December amid accusations the government was dragging its heels for political reasons and after a third senior economic official quit in three months.

Failure to pass last year’s budget was a big factor in the unprecedented political turmoil in Israel that led to three elections in a year, the last one held in March.

Uncertainty regarding 2021’s budget has again threatened to topple Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s fractious emergency government, which he formed with rivals to help the country weather the coronavirus crisis.

Finance Minister Israel Katz said they are now starting to prepare the 2021 budget with discussions in the coming days to determine budget goals and targets.

“The budget will address the need to deal with the continuing coronavirus pandemic as well as the need to lead the economy back to full employment and activity and growth,” Katz said in a statement.

Israel’s economy has been hit hard from the COVID-19 outbreak and is expected to contract in 2020 for the first time in nearly two decades. It still using a pro-rated version of the 2019 budget, although lawmakers have approved more than 100 billion shekels ($30 billion) in state aid to help businesses and households hurt by the virus.

Shortly before Katz announced progress on the budget, the ministry’s director-general, Keren Turner-Eyal, said she would be stepping down in the coming weeks. No reason for her departure was given, and Katz named Eran Yaacov, the head of Israel’s tax authority, as interim director-general.

Turner-Eyal was appointed to the post in May by Katz, but disagreements between the two quickly became apparent, culminating in a public censure after budget chief Shaul Meridor resigned