Movie theaters hoped to be back in business in a big way this fall, attracting stir-crazy audiences with a slate of blockbusters that included “Tenet,” “Mulan,” and “No Time to Die.” For an industry that had been brought to its knees by the coronavirus pandemic, with closures that left them without revenues for much of the year, nothing was more important than a grand and successful reopening.

Unfortunately, more than a month after “Tenet” debuted to disappointing box office results, the exhibition sector is in an even more dire situation. “Mulan” opted to debut as a premium on-demand offering via Disney Plus. “No Time to Die” pushed its premiere back into April, and several other movies have postponed their releases into next spring or summer when, studios hope, a vaccine will be widely available. On Saturday, Cineworld, one of the world’s largest exhibitors, announced that it was considering closing its theaters down, citing the lack of major releases available to screen. Other exhibitors may follow suit.

John Fithian, head of the National Association of Theatre Owners, believes that the main stumbling block preventing movie theaters from rebounding is Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s decision to keep cinemas closed indefinitely. That’s robbing studios of a major market to show their films, Fithian argues, which may jeopardize the release of upcoming blockbusters such as “Wonder Woman 1984” and Pixar’s “Soul.” In an interview with Variety, the theater business’s top lobbyist urged studios to keep releasing movies during the pandemic and warned that the industry faces financial ruin without government assistance.

“No Time to Die” has delayed its release until 2021. What impact will that have on the exhibition industry?

The Bond franchise is very important to exhibition, so we were disappointed with the move. The failure of Gov. Cuomo to allow movie theaters

CNN anchor Chris Cuomo’s interview with Sen. Ted Cruz descended into name-calling and insults on Wednesday night.

The 20-minute interview began with Cuomo asking the Texas Republican if President Trump did enough during the debate to condemn white supremacy, to which Cruz said he was glad the president clarified those remarks. The conversation took a turn when Cruz called the media “completely hypocritical” for how they cover racial comments from Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden.

“The press is partisan in this regard. Ten years ago, 2010, Joe Biden gave a eulogy for Robert Byrd, who was a Grand Cyclops of the KKK …” Cruz began before Cuomo interjected to call his point a “weak-ass argument.”

Then, when the senator offered to provide additional criticism of the former vice president, Cuomo responded, “The old Ted Cruz, who he called ‘Lyin’ Ted,’ when he wasn’t insulting your wife and your father, tweeted, ‘Hey you’re better than this, Mr. President.’ What happened to that Ted? I don’t know if he changed or if just you changed, for some reason.”

Cruz said Cuomo was insulting him and was “enjoying it.” He then took aim at CNN.

“Chris, there was a time when CNN actually cared about being journalistic and talking about facts. Donald Trump broke you guys,” he said. “I mean your entire show, your entire network now is just how much you hate Trump.”

Moments later the conversation got personal once again, this time as they were discussing the coronavirus and how specific states handled their outbreaks. Cruz brought up Cuomo’s brother, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, and claimed that Democrats have sought to blame COVID-19 deaths on their political enemies.

“There is something disgusting that Democrats are doing, that Joe Biden does, and that you do, you try to blame