Members of the decentralized finance (defi) community are upset with Yearn Finance founder Andre Cronje over the mishap with Cronje’s secret Eminence (EMN) project. The Eminence protocol gathered $15 million before the project was ultimately hacked before the official launch.

According to a recent blog post published on Medium, a group of defi community members plan to sue Yearn Finance founder, Andre Cronje, and fork YFI as well. As news.Bitcoin.com recently reported, there’s been a lack of trust in Cronje’s work since an undercover project that didn’t even launch was drained for $15 million in funds.

The project was called Eminence (EMN) and after the incident, Cronje said he was lying low from social media.

“We are crowdfunding capital to finance a lawsuit against Andre Cronje, Kirby and Banteg over the EMN scandal on behalf of the victims,” explains the blog post written by the group dubbed ‘EMN Investigation.’ The team added:

Andre Cronje, the founder of Yearn Finance, hyped a surprise launch. Eminence Finance contracts were deployed by the Yearn Finance deployer, and Andre tweeted and retweeted as liquidity flowed in.

The investigation team says that Kirby, the head of communications at Yearn Finance, gave instructions on how to leverage the contracts and promoted Eminence prior to launch.

The group also accuses the Yearn Finance developer, Banteg, of “selling tokens bought from the contract to Uniswap right until the contracts were hacked.”

“The hacker drained the entire $15 million that had been locked up in liquidity by using a flash loan exploit,” the EMN investigation team detailed. “The hacker then returned $8 million to Andre, and was misappropriated.” The seething blog post is also filled with screenshots, tweets, and market charts that aim to bolster the group’s argument.

The investigation group is asking for ETH donations to

Yearn.Finance is managing a leadership transition right now and appears to be doing so effectively.

Andre Cronje, the prolific coder and creator of Yearn, said he’s quit the project – and decentralized finance (DeFi) altogether – out of frustration with its realities. 

“I’m not building anything at all anymore,” he told CoinDesk over Telegram on Oct. 1. “I do it because I’m passionate, but if people are going to use my test environments, then lose money, and then hold me liable, it means there is 0 upside and only risk for me.”

Yearn.Finance is the leading robo-adviser for yield in DeFi and the progenitor of the “fair launch” concept that has proved so powerful this summer. However, when users piled into a smart contract he was building in late September that wasn’t ready, got hit by an exploit and then blamed Cronje, that proved too much for the developer.

This is a complicated piece of news for a reporter to share. Cronje told CoinDesk of his decision over Telegram on Oct. 1, but then asked us not to report it. This falls outside of the typical protocol for reporters and sources (“off the record” has to be stipulated up front), and yet we also appreciate that Cronje felt himself under enormous stress. Thus, we held off reporting.  

So we’ve sat on the news, in something of a dilemma, because we were struggling to balance respect for his wishes and the public interest in knowing whether a revered creator is still around. Word has begun to trickle out about Cronje’s move, however (including denials from others involved in Yearn), and the community has begun to sense his absence. It is no longer in the public interest to withhold this information.

While Yearn is clearly not directly comparable to Bitcoin, we think