(Bloomberg) — Guolian Securities Co.’s effort to acquire bigger rival Sinolink Securities Co. has ended after the firms couldn’t agree on terms to create a $13 billion Chinese broker in the consolidating industry.



a close up of a man: HAIKOU, CHINA - MAY 09: (CHINA OUT) An investor watches the electronic board at a stock exchange hall on May 9, 2011 in Haikou, Hainan Province of China. The power companies and train markers led Chinese stocks rebounding on Monday. With the benchmark Shanghai Composite Index rose 8.57 points, or 0.3 percent, to close at 2,872.46 points. (Photo by VCG/VCG via Getty Images)


© Photographer: VCG/Getty Images AsiaPac
HAIKOU, CHINA – MAY 09: (CHINA OUT) An investor watches the electronic board at a stock exchange hall on May 9, 2011 in Haikou, Hainan Province of China. The power companies and train markers led Chinese stocks rebounding on Monday. With the benchmark Shanghai Composite Index rose 8.57 points, or 0.3 percent, to close at 2,872.46 points. (Photo by VCG/VCG via Getty Images)

Sinolink had agreed to be bought in an all-stock deal announced Sept. 20, but specific details for the combination couldn’t be agreed to, the companies said in separate but identical stock exchange filings late Monday.

The deal announcement had sent Guolian’s Hong Kong-listed stock soaring as much as 75% on Sept. 21. Shares of Guolian trading in China dropped as much as 5.8% as the market opened on Tuesday, while Sinolink Securities rose as much as 2.9%.

Gallery: These 47 Billionaires Got Richer During The Pandemic (GOBankingRates)

China’s $1.1 trillion securities industry is facing increased pressure as Wall Street firms such as Goldman Sachs Group Inc. and JPMorgan Chase & Co. are allowed to take full control of ventures in the country this year, forcing consolidation.

(Updates with shares in third paragraph)

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KALAMAZOO, MI — A new farm and food network is looking to bring more representation to Kalamazoo’s food ecosystem.

Remi Harrington created Zoo City this year to fill the racial gap left in agriculture. The most recent Census Agriculture report from 2017 shows that Black farmers make up 1.4% of the country’s 3.4 million producers.

Similarly, Black farmers in Michigan make up less than 2% of statewide producers.

Harrington sees Zoo City as a pathway for the Black community to participate in both land ownership and the food economy — something she says is part of their cultural history.

“Black people came to America to tend the land, to be stewards of land, and we come from agrarian culture,” she said. “The fact that we cannot participate in the industry ecosystem in that way, it’s a travesty.”

For Harrington, being a steward of her own land isn’t just about the historical roots of her ancestors but also her immediate family and the agency its given her as a single mother.

Being able to literally get her hands dirty and grow her own food while teaching her daughter about the environment has been both empowering and therapeutic, she said.

In 2014, she began work on Tegan’s Hopeful Storybook Garden, named after her daughter. The Jackson Street community garden came to life two years later as a project of Harrington’s nonprofit The Urban Folk Art Exploratory.

The Storybook Garden is no longer operational but Harrington’s vision for the land and the neighborhood has taken new shape in the Zoo City project.

Throughout the Edison neighborhood Harrington has plans for a food cooperative, an educational space and a micro-nursery with raised planter beds for rent.

Through Zoo City, Harrington is looking to tackle equity in the food industry from a neighborhood, city and

BAY CITY, MI – Bay City’s South End is one step closer to becoming the new home of a state-of-the-art marijuana growing facility that promises to bring about 100 jobs to the area.

On Monday, Oct. 5, the Bay City Commission approved an Industrial Facilities Tax Exemption Certificate application for Shango Park Bay City Inc. to allow the company to rehabilitate a vacant 24,800-square-foot building located at 1601 Garfield. The approved IFT is for the total amount of $7 million for 12 years.

Shango’s proposed plan involves turning the empty building and its 5-acre property into a mixed-use facility for marijuana cultivation, processing and storage, with the possibility for corporate offices. The existing structure will primarily be used for cultivation and offices while additions are planned to include a bakery and extraction lab.

Construction is slated to start in Fall of 2020, with the first phase of construction estimated to be wrapped up in Spring 2021.

Shango’s website refers to itself as a leading medical and recreational medical dispensary license holder, grower and manufacturer in multiple states across the country. Shango currently has facilities and sells products in Oregon, Nevada and Washington, with the plan to strengthen Michigan as a new player in its roster. Shango currently has a medical marijuana provisioning center in Lapeer but the company has larger plans for the Bay City location.

Matt Kowalski of Warren-based Shango was in attendance at Monday’s meeting to clarify details for commissioners about the tax abatement and plans for the property.

In exchange for the tax exemption, Shango plans to revamp the property and add approximately 100 new jobs of varying skill level.

“We’ll have jobs anywhere from janitorial staff all the way up to PhD’s,” said Kowalski.

In addition, Kowalski stated that the company is planning a provisioning center

(This story has been updated with additional information.)

FLINT, MI — A federal lawsuit filed on behalf of Flint children claims three companies that helped finance Flint’s participation in the Karegnondi Water Authority are partly responsible for the city’s water crisis.

The lawsuit, filed Wednesday, Oct. 7, in U.S. District Court, says J.P. Morgan Chase & Co., Wells Fargo Bank National Association, and Stifel, Nicolaus, and Company, Inc., pushed ahead with bonding to finance construction of a new water pipeline to Lake Huron while knowing the city would use the Flint River as its short-term source of drinking water and of the resulting hazards to residents’ health.

Without the bond financing, Flint would not have been able to join the KWA and tap into its new pipeline, the lawsuit alleges, the KWA would not have been able to start construction of the project, and the city would never have switched its water source to the river.

Flint was initial partner in the KWA, agreeing to buy a set amount of raw water from the new pipeline, but unlike Genesee County, the other primary partner, the city stopped purchasing pre-treated water from the city of Detroit before the pipeline was built, switching instead to treating its own river water during parts of 2014 and 2015.

The city’s change in water source triggered the water crisis, sending highly corrosive water through the distribution system, including thousands of lead and galvanized service lines to homes, causing elevated levels of lead and bacteria in tap water.

State appointed emergency managers were charged with running the city’s affairs at the time bonding was secured for the pipeline project.

“J.P. Morgan Chase, Wells Fargo, and Stifel knew … that the Flint River would be used as an interim source of drinking water for Flint for the

In a year that has thrown a pandemic, natural disasters and economic calamity at us while we lurch closer to a presidential election, stability can feel elusive. No matter how well laid your plans, some new crisis might be lurking around the corner, waiting to upend your life.

While it’s never been more clear how much is out of our control, you can still take steps to improve your financial stability. And it’s not just about cash flow.

FIND YOUR IDEA OF STABILITY

Financial stability is both a state of money and a state of mind, says Ed Coambs, a certified financial planner and certified financial therapist near Charlotte, North Carolina.

On the money side, stability is straightforward. “You have a budget, you know where your money is going, and you know how much you should be saving to meet your bigger goals,” Coambs says.

“What’s a little harder is more the state of mind,” Coambs says. This financial peace of mind is subjective and looks different from one person to the next.

Do some self-reflection to pin down what stability means for you. Maybe you don’t want to feel anxious when you check your bank balance, or you hope to save enough for retirement so you won’t have to worry about the future. Whatever your focus, feeling stable means you won’t have to constantly worry about money.

If you find yourself overwhelmed because the pandemic has destabilized your finances, follow the advice of Tara Tussing Unverzagt, a Torrance, California, certified financial planner and financial therapist. She advises people to think through the worst that could happen rather than avoiding the topic out of fear.

“This often helps people open up a way to reframe the situation from, ‘There’s no way out of this,’ to ‘I have some choices —