As we continue to slog through the economic fallout from the coronavirus crisis, with no immediate financial relief expected, the Texas Restaurant Association says 25% of the restaurants in Texas could close before the end of the year.

Here are four restaurant groups that have announced closures in Dallas-Fort Worth. Note that some appear to be temporary.

10 Krispy Kremes in D-FW

Most of the Krispy Kreme doughnut shops in North Texas are “temporarily closed,” according to signs on the doors and notes on the company website. One Krispy Kreme in North Texas, in Westworth Village west of Fort Worth, appears to be open.

We asked reps from Krispy Kreme why the shops are closed or when they might reopen. Spokespeople did not respond to repeated requests for comment.

The 10 temporarily closed Krispy Kremes are in (or on): Allen, Arlington, Cedar Hill, Dallas’ Greenville Avenue, Dallas’ Marsh Lane, Frisco, Grapevine, Mesquite, Richardson and Watauga. If you’re looking for other doughnut shops in Dallas-Fort Worth, check out this list of options we published for National Donut Day in June.

Top Pot Doughnuts and Coffee in Dallas and Richardson

When Top Pot expanded to Dallas from Seattle, a Washington native put it like this: "This is kind of a big deal." The restaurants were open for several years, in several areas of Dallas and Richardson, before they closed in 2020.
When Top Pot expanded to Dallas from Seattle, a Washington native put it like this: “This is kind of a big deal.” The restaurants were open for several years, in several areas of Dallas and Richardson, before they closed in 2020.(Robert W. Hart / Special Contributor)

Beloved Seattle doughnut shop Top Pot has shuttered all of its cafes in North Texas. The closures were originally temporary, scheduled at the end of March as the pandemic threatened food and beverage companies. But Top Pot co-counder Mark Klebeck confirmed in early October that the closures are permanent.

The restaurants were on Lower Greenville in Dallas, at Hillcrest and Northwest Highway in Dallas’ Preston

Chapman's Ice Cream has decided to make its pandemic pay raise permanent.
Chapman’s Ice Cream has decided to make its pandemic pay raise permanent.

The vice president of an Ontario ice cream company said the decision to make its $2 per hour pandemic pay raise permanent was “the right thing to do.”

“You don’t want to get into a position where, as an employer and as a leader, you’re taking something away from your employees,” Ashley Chapman, the vice president of Chapman’s Ice Cream, said in an interview.

“There are so many expenses that people have been confronted with. We just want our employees to be okay throughout all this.”

The Markdale, Ont.-based company had first introduced a $2 per hour pay bump for its 750 production and distribution employees in mid-March, when the coronavirus pandemic prompted government-imposed lockdowns on non-essential businesses. Last week, the company decided to make that pay raise permanent, increasing the starting wage at the manufacturing facility to $18 per hour. That wage will bump up to $18.50 per hour after new employees pass a three-month probationary period.

Chapman said another part of the company’s consideration was ensuring that employees were making a living wage. Two years ago, the company conducted a study to determine the living wage for employees living in the Markdale, Ont. area. Chapman said the previous wage offered by the ice cream maker had met the living wage range for the area, but costs – particularly related to housing – have since increased.

“The consensus was that in our area, living wage was between $18 and $18.50 per hour. That kind of helped push the decision to make it permanent,” he said.

In the early days of the pandemic, Chapman’s had to shut down its two production facilities for about two weeks in order to determine how to operate while adhering to proper safety