BYU-Idaho says it will seek out and possibly expel students who may have intentionally tried to be infected with the coronavirus.

An Idaho college says it is “deeply troubled” by reports that people in its community may have intentionally exposed themselves to the coronavirus in the hopes of being paid more for plasma donations that could contain COVID-19 antibodies.

BYU-Idaho, located in the southeastern town of Rexburg, says it is actively searching to find out if any of its students have done this.

“Students who are determined to have intentionally exposed themselves or others to the virus will be immediately suspended from the university and may be permanently dismissed,” the university said in a statement.

Some private blood banks pay more for plasma that contains COVID-19 antibodies.

The university cautioned last month that it may have to shut down the campus and switch to an all-remote learning format if a recent upward trend of COVID-19 cases in Idaho and Madison County continue. 

The university says it realizes that the pandemic ls leading to strains on the community, including financial.

“There is never a need to resort to behavior that endangers health or safety in order to make ends meet,” the university said, offering contact information for student resources.

Idaho currently ranks sixth in the country for new cases per capita, according to a tally from Johns Hopkins University, with more than 48,660 total confirmed cases of coronavirus statewide. So far more than 500 Idaho residents have died because of COVID-19.

RELATED: US colleges struggle to salvage semester amid COVID-19 outbreaks

RELATED: Reports: Several COVID-19 positive students in Ohio throw house party despite quarantine

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source Article

More than 22 million American jobs were lost in the past six months; stock markets have been up and down; and people are generally anxious about what’s in their bank accounts right now.



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If you’re lucky enough to have the funds you need despite all the recent economic turbulence, ask yourself one key question, says Bradley T. Klontz, an associate professor of financial psychology at Creighton University: “Why is it OK for you to have money when other people don’t?”

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Answering this question is not about comparing your finances to anyone else’s, he told The New York Times. It’s about seeing money as a tool, rather than as a measuring stick.

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Having a satisfying answer is crucial, “particularly if you come into money fast,” he says. “If you don’t have a good answer, you’re going to sabotage yourself. You’re going to find ways to get rid of it.” Or, he warns, you could end up feeling disconnected from and less active in your community. Remember that “we’re here to make the world a better place,” and money can help you do that.

Wasting time on comparisons or feeling guilty isn’t helpful as it can lead to impulsive decisions or distract from your long-term financial goals. Instead, it’s important to know how to maintain a budget no matter your net worth, and to understand how you earned your money and what you want to do with it, including how it can help you make good, productive decisions.

Understand what money means to you—and have a plan

A 2019 study from Applied Research in

Brigham Young University-Idaho warned on Monday about accounts of college students “intentionally” trying to contract COVID-19 in order to make money by donating plasma with antibodies. 

The Idaho university issued a statement saying officials were “deeply troubled” by the alleged behavior and “is actively seeking evidence of such conduct among our student body.”

Students who are determined to have intentionally exposed themselves or others to the virus will be immediately suspended from the university and may be permanently dismissed,” the university stated.

“The contraction and spread of COVID-19 is not a light matter,” the statement continued. “Reckless disregard for health and safety will inevitably lead to additional illness and loss of life in our community.”

University officials noted that they had previously cautioned last month that if Idaho or Madison County continue to experience surges in cases, the university may have to switch to fully online learning. 

The release also encouraged students who are participating in this behavior to consult financial and mental health resources, saying, “There is never a need to resort to behavior that endangers health or safety in order to make ends meet.”

Brigham Young University-Idaho has confirmed 109 COVID-19 cases among students and 22 cases among employees.

The Food and Drug Administration permitted convalescent plasmas from COVID-19 survivors to be used as an emergency therapy for those with coronavirus. The FDA states that the plasma that has antibodies “may be effective in treating COVID-19 and that the known and potential benefits of the product outweigh the known and potential risks.”

Two potential plasma donation locations near the university are the Grifols Biomat USA Rexburg location and the BioLife Plasma Services, NPR reported. The first’s website says it gives donors $100 per visit and East Idaho News reported the latter provides $200 for each of the

DUBLIN, Oct. 13, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — The “Income Protection – United Kingdom (UK) Protection Insurance 2020″ report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com’s offering.

The report provides an in-depth assessment of the income protection market, looking at current and historical market sizes with regards to changes in contracts and premiums. It examines how income protection products are distributed and highlights key changes in the competitive landscape, as well as the proposition of the key market players. It provides five-year forecasts of contracts and premiums to 2024 and discusses how the market, distribution, and products offered are likely to change in the future, as well as the reasons for these changes.

The UK’s income protection market has grown strongly in recent years. Of the main protection products, income protection was the only product to register double-digit growth in premiums in 2019. Advised sales remain far more common than non-advised sales. However, the non-advice channel has experienced the fastest growth over recent years in terms of new business premiums.

Income protection providers face the prospects of increased claims due to job losses and increased illnesses as a result of COVID-19. As such, insurers have been forced to withdraw unemployment cover from the market and add exclusions to the wording of those policies that remain. The market is anticipated to plunge in 2020 before returning to growth. Financial hardship will highlight how vulnerable people are without a regular income, be it the result of unemployment or illness. This will generate strong demand for income protection products over the coming years.

Scope

  • New business premiums in the income protection market grew 18.3% to reach £65.5m in 2019, making it the only protection product to register double-digit growth by this measure.
  • Aviva strengthened its position as the largest provider of income protection insurance,

Happy Tuesday and welcome back to On The Money. I’m Sylvan Lane, and here’s your nightly guide to everything affecting your bills, bank account and bottom line.



a man and a woman wearing a suit and tie: On The Money: Pelosi, citing 'leverage' over Trump, holds strong to $2.2T in COVID-19 aid | McConnell to force vote on 'targeted' relief bill next week | Trump again asks court to shield tax records


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On The Money: Pelosi, citing ‘leverage’ over Trump, holds strong to $2.2T in COVID-19 aid | McConnell to force vote on ‘targeted’ relief bill next week | Trump again asks court to shield tax records

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THE BIG DEAL-Pelosi, citing ‘leverage’ over Trump, holds strong to $2.2T in COVID-19 aid: Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) on Tuesday shot down entreaties from some Democrats to cut a $1.8 trillion deal with the White House on coronavirus relief, arguing that President Trump’s pleas for Congress to “go big” have given her leverage to hold out for more aid.

“I appreciate the, shall we say, a couple people saying, ‘Take it, take it, take it,'” Pelosi said in a phone conference with Democrats, according to source on the call. “Take it? Take it? Even the president is saying, ‘Go big or go home.'”

  • Pelosi and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin have been in near-daily talks in search of an elusive stimulus agreement, even as the prospect of a deal before the Nov. 3 elections has faded.
  • Mnuchin last week had offered a $1.8 trillion package, up from an earlier proposal of $1.6 trillion, prompting a growing number of House Democrats to urge the Speaker to come down from her $2.2 trillion proposal.
  • That figure was already a reduction from the Democrats’ $3.4