Quiz: What’s one advantage the president has that the market does not?

Answer: He can get a doctor’s note telling you everything is wonderful. 

But investors? They’re left on their own, left trying to forecast when a stimulus bill will land, left watching every vaccine trial to spot a winner, left waiting up at night for earnings reports, and left tracking technical indicators for clues about what’s churning underneath the surface. 

Fortunately, investors do, however, have experts who can guide them. Helping us get through this messy, mucky October are Real Money and Real Money Pro writers Jim Cramer, Paul Price, Maleeha Bengali, Alex Frew McMillan, and Jim Collins.

Jim Cramer: Let’s Beat Covid-19

Cramer lays out what is happening right now to get the pandemic under control and what it will look like not that long from now — even before a vaccine is available.

Here’s the tests and therapies that Cramer contends will change the channel on the Covid outlook.

Price: Give Stocks a Second Chance 

Few stocks go up in straight-line moves. Instead, writes Price, most tend to spurt higher, tail off, then rise again. While the interim selloffs often shake out traders who mainly trade on momentum, plus those who fail to understand the companies’ true worth, there’s still opportunity awaiting for those willing to give second chances.

See how Price would play a select group of stocks — even following their earlier rebounds from March’s lows.

Jim Collins: There’s Trouble in Bubbleland 

We are in the midst of a unprecedented financial bubble, writes Collins. Will a recovery from the Covid-19 lockdowns ease the bubble before it bursts in our faces?

Read why Collins isn’t holding his breath, and how the situation could play out for insurers and others. 

Bengali: It’s Value Vs. Growth. Pick One.

Want to migrate your existing coronavirus policy to a different insurer? The IRDAI has officially announced that policy holders can renew, migrate and even port their existing Covid-19 health insurance policy.

Currently the three popular variants of Coronavirus health insurance includes Corona Kavach, Corona Rakshak and Group Corona Kavach Policy.

The IRDAI asked insurers to give policyholders the choice to renew, migrate and allow porting of the above policies.

Accordingly, the three new rules that policyholders should be aware of are:

1. Renewal of policies allowed for three and half months, six and half months or nine and half months as per policyholder’s choice.

2. Porting or migration or continuation will not have any waiting period. Existing waiting period is 15 days for such policies. Waiting period will be applicable only if policyholder alters the sum insured during time of renewal. Applicable onlly for increase in sum insured and not the whole policy. The IRDAI has also allowed portability of Corona Kavach policies from one insurer to another with protection to waiting periods.

3. For Corona Kavach individual policies, insurers can allow migration to other health insurance policies.

4. For group cover policies, insurer can migrate to other service provider when an existing member quits the group or police ceases.

5. While migrating, the waiting period will be protected for the insureds under individual and group policies.

The migration/portability of individual/group Corona Kavach policies to other comprehensive health insurance policies are allowed till the end of the Corona Kavach policy.

Corona Kavach and Corona Rakshak policies can be renewed till March 31, 2021.

The insurance regulator’s move is expected to increase the sale of other health insurance policies.
 

Source Article

Children holding hensImage copyright
FFCC

Schools and residential trip providers fear they will no longer be covered by insurance for visits cancelled because of coronavirus.

After changes last week, advice on the Association of British Insurers website no longer says schools will be covered for the loss of trips.

It now says schools should “seek a refund from the venue”.

The ABI says the advice was amended to reflect exclusions in policies as the pandemic continues.

Outdoor education centres across the UK have been closed since March under government coronavirus restrictions.

Last week providers wrote to the prime minister asking him to save outdoor education, which they said “faces an existential threat”.

Advising schools to ask for refunds rather than claim on their insurance for cancelled trips is another blow, according to Vanessa Fox, chief executive of the charity Farms for City Children.

Ms Fox says she spotted changes to the ABI’s Frequently Asked Questions section last week after following a link from the Department for Education website.

She told the BBC she had copied and pasted the section into an email to a colleague on 6 October.

At the time it promised: “In general, most schools will be covered under their insurance policy.”

The guidance advised schools to first seek a refund from the venue or tour provider – but said if the venue could no longer host the trip “because of official government guidance, the closure of the venue, or their reluctance to accept school trips due to their stated concerns about the spread of coronavirus, the school will be covered”.

However, she says the following day, the mention of cover had disappeared, with the answer just saying “the school should seek a refund from the venue”.

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ABI website

Image caption

The guidance changed overnight, says Vanessa Fox

WASHINGTON/LONDON (Reuters) – The international community must do more to tackle the economic fallout of the COVID-19 crisis, the head of the International Monetary Fund said on Monday, publicly calling on the World Bank to accelerate its lending to hard-hit African countries.

FILE PHOTO: IMF Managing Director Kristalina Georgieva speaks during a conference hosted by the Vatican on economic solidarity, at the Vatican, February 5, 2020. REUTERS/Remo Casilli

Some of the key events of the virtual and elongated annual meetings of the IMF and World Bank take place this week, with the most pressing issue how to support struggling countries.

“We are going to continue to push to do even more,” IMF Managing Director Kristalina Georgieva said during an online FT Africa summit.

“I would beg for also more grants for African countries. The World Bank has grant-giving capacity. Perhaps you can do even more… and bilateral donors can do more in that regard,” Georgieva said in an unusual public display of discord between the two major international financial institutions.

No immediate comment was available from the Bank.

Georgieva last week said the IMF had provided $26 billion in fast-track support to African states since the start of the crisis, but a dearth of private lending meant the region faced a financing gap of $345 billion through 2023.

The pandemic, a collapse in commodity prices and a plague of locusts have hit Africa particularly hard, putting 43 million more people at risk of extreme poverty, according to World Bank estimates. African states have reported more than 1 million coronavirus cases and some 23,000 deaths.

G20 governments are expected to extend for six months their Debt Service Suspension Initiative (DSSI) which has so far frozen around $5 billion of poorer countries’ debt payments, but pressure is

(Bloomberg) — For decades, diesel has underpinned India’s economic growth and the fortunes of its refiners, but the pandemic has caused the nation’s most consumed fuel to lose some of its luster.

Since Covid-19-lockdowns have eased across India, diesel consumption has trailed the rebound in gasoline with trucks remaining idle amid a softer economy. Motor fuel use, however, has benefited from people choosing their own cars and scooters over public transport to avoid the risk of infection.



a pile of luggage stacked on top of a truck: Idled Trucks Have India Fuel Demand Headed for Five-Year Low


© Bloomberg
Idled Trucks Have India Fuel Demand Headed for Five-Year Low

Trucks sit idle near a wholesale market in Delhi, India on Sept. 4.

Photographer: Anindito Mukherjee/Bloomberg

While diesel is still king in India — fuel sales are double that of gasoline — the uneven demand recovery has created a unique challenge for India’s refiners, just as more headwinds emerge from the use of hydrogen and natural gas in major guzzlers such as trucks and buses.

“Personal mobility over public transport has supported gasoline, but diesel is getting knocked-out across the sectors,” said Senthil Kumaran, head of south Asia oil at industry consultant FGE. “It’s a structural shift in trends that we are witnessing. The refining system is caught at the crossroads, but it will gradually adjust to the change.”



Speed Breakers Ahead


© Bloomberg
Speed Breakers Ahead

Refiners are expected to focus on making less diesel and more gasoline and petrochemicals to respond to changing demand. Reliance Industries Ltd. has flagged a shift away from transport fuels, while Indian Oil Corp. has signaled greater diversification to reduce its dependence on its fuels business. The country’s biggest processor also plans to roll out a fleet of buses powered by a blend of hydrogen and compressed natural gas.

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Indian Oil Corp.’s foray into hydrogen-powered public transport follows a push by the government encouraging the