Insurance is designed to offer peace of mind, but there’s a reason your policy has all that fine print: You might not have the coverage you expect. Like any other insurance policy, renters insurance has exclusions, and knowing about them ahead of time can help you avoid unexpected bills in a disaster.

Just as important, though, is knowing what IS covered. All that fine print in your policy likely includes coverage you might not expect, which could save you money down the line.

COVERED: BELONGINGS OUTSIDE YOUR HOME

Most renters know insurance covers personal belongings within their home but may not realize their things are probably covered off-premises too, including when traveling. Barbara Madvin, an insurance agent at Gaspar Insurance Services, says vehicle break-ins are some of the most common insurance claims she sees for renters. While damage to the car itself is generally covered by your auto policy, your renters insurance pays for items stolen from the vehicle, as long as their value exceeds your deductible.

Your renters policy will also cover your belongings if you move them from your home to a storage unit, a friend’s house or anywhere else to protect them from a covered disaster. In the event of a wildfire or hurricane evacuation, this can be particularly valuable, according to Christine G. Barlow, a chartered property casualty underwriter. This coverage typically lasts 30 days.

COVERED: LIVING EXPENSES IF YOUR RENTAL IS UNINHABITABLE


While your home is undergoing repairs due to a fire or other covered disaster, your insurance company will usually pay for you to maintain your normal standard of living somewhere else.

A “normal standard of living” is broader than you might think. For instance, if you live in a rental home with a pool that you use every day, “the carrier needs to

FILE PHOTO: Mexico’s President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador delivers his second state of the union address at National Palace in Mexico City, Mexico, September 1, 2020. REUTERS/Henry Romero/File Photo

MONTERREY, Mexico (Reuters) – Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador said on Wednesday he respects the International Monetary Fund’s recommendations to Mexico but that it should “stop covering up for corrupt governments.”

On Tuesday, the IMF said Mexico should implement larger near-term fiscal support to alleviate the economic distress largely brought about by measures to contain the coronavirus pandemic.

The IMF recommended the government expand its welfare net and unemployment benefits, and lower interest rates. It also proposed tax reform to support spending in the medium-term.

Lopez Obrador on Wednesday said he respected the IMF but that international financial entities were no longer dictating economic policy in Mexico.

“All we ask … is that they stop rescuing large corporations and that they rescue the people, that they stop covering up for corrupt governments,” he told his regular morning news conference, without providing details on any such potential cases.

The IMF declined to comment.

Reporting by Ana Isabel Martinez and Raul Cortes, writing by Laura Gottesdiener; Editing by Frank Jack Daniel and Steve Orlofsky

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Traveling now carries with it more uncertainty than ever before. If you plan on traveling anytime soon, one thing you can do to protect yourself is get a trip insurance policy that includes coronavirus coverage. Previously, many insurers excluded COVID-related claims due to the virus’ status as a foreseen event/pandemic. But now, some insurers are changing their tune. Here’s what you need to know about how to find travel insurance providers that offer coronavirus-related coverage, as well as what is and isn’t covered.

What is covered

Coronavirus coverage falls into several categories:

  • Trip cancellation: You need to cancel a trip prior to departure because you, a covered travel companion or possibly someone you need to care for contracted COVID-19.
  • Trip delay: Your trip is delayed due to changing COVID-related guidelines.
  • Travel medical coverage: You (or a covered travel companion) become ill with COVID-19 while traveling abroad and incur health care expenses or require an evacuation.

Of providers that are offering COVID policies, most are covering these expenses.

What is not covered
  • Countries with Level 4 travel advisories: Some insurers disclose that if a Level 4 Do Not Travel advisory is issued by the U.S. Department of State for a specific country, you will not receive coronavirus-related coverage. With cases surging in various countries unexpectedly, the list of Level 4 countries is constantly changing. Before booking a trip and purchasing a policy, make sure to check that the country does not have a Level 4 advisory.
  • Fear of getting sick while traveling: Canceling a trip because you’re afraid you’ll get sick does not qualify for coverage under your travel insurance policy. Travel insurance providers have a list of standard reasons that qualify for cancellation, including: car accident, jury duty, terrorist act, military duty and other extenuating circumstances. If you


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Should investors fear no assets can protect them from increased turbulence in global markets amid November’s looming U.S. election and persistent worries around the COVID-19 pandemic?

That’s the concern addressed by JP Morgan strategists who warned that many traditional haven investments in September have not performed as advertised, providing scant shelter as global equities came under steady, but incessant pressure over the past few weeks.

“For those looking for hedge protection, this typical basket of defensives is functioning about as well as fire insurance that covers just one bedroom in the house,” said a JPMorgan team of analysts led by John Normand, in a note Friday.

By their estimation, the performance of haven assets this month has been the worst in more than 10 years, when looking at periods with more than a 5% decline of the MSCI All Country World Index
ACWI,
+1.59%
,
a widely used composite benchmark that tracks returns of a mix of equities from emerging market and developed markets.

The bank’s analysts said nearly all of the world’s typical safe havens, including U.S. government bonds, gold
GOLD,
+0.57%
,
Japanese yen
USDJPY,
-0.06%

and the Swiss franc
CHFUSD,
+0.50%

did not move much in September.

The analysts, however, did point out how a short position against emerging market currencies would have delivered positive gains during the turbulent period.

See: Investors debate whether currencies can replace role of bonds in a zero interest-rate world

While the Nasdaq Composite
COMP,
+1.86%

saw a correction, commonly defined as a 10% drop from a recent peak, earlier this month, the 10-year Treasury yield BX:TMUBMUSD10Y largely stayed within a narrow trading band between 0.70% and 0.60%. Bond prices move in the opposite direction of yields.

Typically, haven sectors rally when a selloff has been sparked in stocks or