Abbey Lee and Wunmi Mosaku
Abbey Lee and Wunmi Mosaku

Secrets come out, Hippolyta is back, and Tic, Leti, and Montrose are headed back in time. It’s the Tulsa episode, everyone! This bit of history which was lost to most non-Black Americans makes it’s second feature on an HBO series. Once again the survivors are front and center, and the endless trauma of Black people in America remains the theme. Lovecraft Country finally explores in depth how Montrose became the man he is today, in this powerfully moving episode.

Poor baby Diana took the brunt of the hit with the Police Captain’s spell. Her blood turned black, her skin shriveled up, Diana must fight to live long enough for Tic, Leti, and Montrose to find a counter spell. All the adults surrounding her quake with fear, knowing the responsibility for the young girls suffering lays at their feet. As they argue, their secrets inch toward the surface. Leti’s pregnancy, and Montrose’s parietal accuracy remain hidden, but Ruby reveals her intrepid affair with Christina. She promises Christina will perform the spell to heal Diana. Unfortunately, only the Police Captain who cast the spell, can lift the curse. The Captain’s spell rotted Diana. First the spell turned Diana into the physical manifestation of a jigga boo, and then caused her to flesh to rot and fester from the inside out.

Luckily, the hellhounds didn’t kill the Captain in last week’s attack – which Leti spun as a gas explosion. But to call him alive and well would be false. We learned that the police force kidnapped Black citizens, and hacked off whatever limbs an officer needed, attaching the Black body part to the white officer with magic. Christina sentenced William to a thousand deaths by overriding this quick-fix spell. But, that line of deaths must end for

Argentina has become the first country to approve the growth and consumption of genetically modified wheat, the country’s agriculture ministry announced Thursday.

The ministry’s scientific commission said in a statement released in Buenos Aires that it had approved a drought-resistant variety of wheat in the world’s fourth-largest exporter of the crop.

“This is the first approval in the world for drought-tolerant genetic transformation in wheat,” the National Commission for Science and Technology (CONICET) said in a statement.

However, experts expressed concern about the growth and marketing of genetically modified crops (GMOs), citing difficulties in marketing such produce to consumers concerned about their effect on health and the environment.

CONICET said the genetic modifications to Argentina’s wheat crop would have to be approved in Brazil, historically the country’s biggest export market, to be commercially viable.

Some 45 percent of Argentina’s wheat exports in 2019 went to Brazil.

Other key markets are Indonesia, Chile and Kenya.

Formal government approval is due to be published on Thursday or Friday in the official Gazette.

The drought-resistant HB4 wheat variety was developed by Argentine biotechnology company Bioceres, working with the National University and CONICET.

“Approval of our HB4 wheat in Argentina represents a groundbreaking milestone for the entire global value chain of this important crop, given the substantial yield increases and significant environmental benefits that our technology offers,” said Bioceres CEO Federico Trucco.

“Now we must go out into the world and convince people that this is super good and be able to generate markets for this wheat, which represents an evolutionary leap.”

The scientific commission of Argentina's agriculture ministry said it had approved a drought-resistant variety of wheat in the world's fourth-largest exporter of the crop The scientific commission of Argentina’s agriculture ministry said it had approved a drought-resistant variety of wheat in the world’s fourth-largest exporter of the crop Photo: AFP / Eitan ABRAMOVICH

Trucco admitted that winning approval from Brazil, the country’s key export market, could



ian busking

Busking has dropped his time significantly from his personal record last year, moving him up to the third position on the team. ART HADDAWAY/Owasso Reporter


Ian Busking’s time on the track this year has been nothing but impressive.

The Owasso junior has dropped his time significantly from his personal record last year, moving him up to the third position on the team.

“He’s one of our best runners,” cross country head coach Blake Collins said. “He takes that initiative all the time to try to figure out how to be better at what he’s doing and help the team.”

Busking, who shifted his PR from 19:01 to 17:52, said he has be intentional about monitoring his daily regiments and maintaining healthy eating habits to achieve his goal of reaching better overall times.

“A lot of it, it has been through the amount of sleep I’ve been getting and everything that I’ve ate, and I’ve drank a lot more water,” Busking said, “and you just have to put so much more time into it, and actually commit to the sport if you want to see that improvement.”

The 16-year-old sprinter has been running for Owasso Public Schools since seventh grade. While his focus has been centered toward leading his team on the track, the collaboration he also brings to the group is a top priority.

“Probably my favorite thing about running is the team aspect,” he said. “I love everyone here, it’s just such a great team culture, and we all just get along together.”

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A person drawing a line graph with the phrase "ETF" in large letters on a chalkboard


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A person drawing a line graph with the phrase “ETF” in large letters on a chalkboard

Vanguard founder Jack Bogle and Berkshire Hathaway (NYSE:BRK.A, NYSE:BRK.B) CEO Warren Buffett shared a similar approach to investing, generally dismissing the idea of regular investors putting their money in international ETFs. 

“Bogle dismisses international diversification. Buffett, meanwhile, says an index fund portfolio of 90 percent S&P 500 and 10 percent Treasurys is probably good enough for most investors — that’s how he is recommending his wife invest. But the anti-international stance is the rare piece of investment advice over which many people dare to disagree with Bogle and Buffett,” CNBC contributor Elizabeth MacBride stated in April 2017. 

At the time of MacBride’s article, the average U.S. mutual fund investor had just 15.6% of their equity portfolio invested in international markets. They call this lack of exposure “home country bias.” 

  • Vanguard FTSE Developed Markets ETF (NYSEARCA:VEA)
  • iShares International Select Dividend ETF (Cboe BZX:IDV)
  • SPDR Portfolio World ex-US ETF (NYSEARCA:SPDW)
  • Schwab International Small-Cap Equity ETF (NYSEARCA:SCHC)
  • iShares MSCI Canada ETF (NYSEARCA:EWC)
  • WisdomTree International MidCap Dividend (NYSEARCA:DIM)
  • First Trust Emerging Markets AlphaDEX Fund (NYSEARCA:FEM)

If carried out for several decades, home country bias can act as a headwind to alpha-beating performance. To avoid getting left behind, here are seven international ETFs you can use to buck the trend. 

International ETFs to Buy: Vanguard FTSE Developed Markets ETF (VEA)



a person holding a sign: A person drawing a line graph with the phrase "ETF" in large letters on a chalkboard


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A person drawing a line graph with the phrase “ETF” in large letters on a chalkboard

If you’re looking to own a massive international ETF, you can’t get any larger than VEA. According to ETFdb.com, VEA is the 8th-largest ETF in the U.S. It