In our previous article, we focused on how the world’s poorer citizens are most vulnerable to the globe’s most dangerous crises: COVID-19 and climate change. The people at most risk of contracting COVID-19 – low-income individuals, women, workers dependent on working in the informal economy, and racial and ethnic minorities – are also the same citizens that are most at risk due to the climate crisis. Reaching true social equity will require a focus on both addressing climate risks and ensuring some level of finance is available to all.

Social equity requires a focus on long-term recovery

The past several months of the COVID-19 pandemic can tell us a lot about how to address climate risks, and importantly how to do so in ways that can achieve social equity.  A strong post-COVID-19 recovery could be a unique policy and investment opportunity to address both climate resilience and equity issues by squarely incentivizing, or even mandating, the financial sector to fill what has otherwise been a gap in financing in order to create resilience for the most vulnerable.

Many policy makers are thinking through practical ways to action this right now. For example, a recent OECD report on Green COVID Recovery recommends “integrating environmental sustainability and socioeconomic equity” in policy packages – by, for example, lowering labor taxes concomitantly with raising taxes on pollution – in order to build long-term resilience, boost the prospects for social equity, and mitigate the regressive effects of environmental policies.

In addition, the IMF has been supporting this idea by promoting a “smarter, greener and fairer” recovery. As the current IMF Managing Director, Kristalina Georgieva, has stated, “We cannot turn back the COVID-19 clock, but we can invest in reducing emissions and adapting to new environmental conditions.”

However, how exactly sustainable and equitable

CHARLOTTE, N.C., Sept. 29, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — LendingTree®, the nation’s leading online loan marketplace, today announced the launch of a series of new features for My LendingTree users to help consumers better manage their financial lives. The LendingTree app can now connect directly with consumers’ checking and savings accounts in addition to credit cards and loans, giving users a more comprehensive overview of their financial profile.   

Powered by Plaid, a data network powering the fintech tools that millions of people rely on to improve their financial lives, My LendingTree users can connect their bank accounts from over 11,000 financial institutions. By integrating checking and savings account information, My LendingTree will provide a comprehensive overview of budgets, spending habits, transaction history and cash flow analysis in the same place users can check credit scores, savings recommmendations and identity monitoring updates. This new feature consolidates the most important financial information in one place, so consumers don’t need to use multiple services or apps to get a gauge on their financial health.

“Fintech is helping to make money easier, which often begins with understanding your financial situation and the options available to you,” said Eric Sager, COO of Plaid. “MyLendingTree now makes it easy to securely link your financial accounts through Plaid, including loans and other debts, and get a comprehensive view of your finances to help you improve your money management.”

New My LendingTree Features:

  • Connect Bank Accounts: Users can connect their bank account(s) to My LendingTree from over 11,000 financial institutions, powered by Plaid.

  • Cash Flow Analysis: Using historical financial transactions and spending history, users can view monthly cash flow projections.

  • Budget Tracker: The budgeting feature informs users how their monthly spending lines up with the recommended budget (below, on track, too high) or they can