Members of the decentralized finance (defi) community are upset with Yearn Finance founder Andre Cronje over the mishap with Cronje’s secret Eminence (EMN) project. The Eminence protocol gathered $15 million before the project was ultimately hacked before the official launch.

According to a recent blog post published on Medium, a group of defi community members plan to sue Yearn Finance founder, Andre Cronje, and fork YFI as well. As news.Bitcoin.com recently reported, there’s been a lack of trust in Cronje’s work since an undercover project that didn’t even launch was drained for $15 million in funds.

The project was called Eminence (EMN) and after the incident, Cronje said he was lying low from social media.

“We are crowdfunding capital to finance a lawsuit against Andre Cronje, Kirby and Banteg over the EMN scandal on behalf of the victims,” explains the blog post written by the group dubbed ‘EMN Investigation.’ The team added:

Andre Cronje, the founder of Yearn Finance, hyped a surprise launch. Eminence Finance contracts were deployed by the Yearn Finance deployer, and Andre tweeted and retweeted as liquidity flowed in.

The investigation team says that Kirby, the head of communications at Yearn Finance, gave instructions on how to leverage the contracts and promoted Eminence prior to launch.

The group also accuses the Yearn Finance developer, Banteg, of “selling tokens bought from the contract to Uniswap right until the contracts were hacked.”

“The hacker drained the entire $15 million that had been locked up in liquidity by using a flash loan exploit,” the EMN investigation team detailed. “The hacker then returned $8 million to Andre, and was misappropriated.” The seething blog post is also filled with screenshots, tweets, and market charts that aim to bolster the group’s argument.

The investigation group is asking for ETH donations to

KALAMAZOO, MI — A new farm and food network is looking to bring more representation to Kalamazoo’s food ecosystem.

Remi Harrington created Zoo City this year to fill the racial gap left in agriculture. The most recent Census Agriculture report from 2017 shows that Black farmers make up 1.4% of the country’s 3.4 million producers.

Similarly, Black farmers in Michigan make up less than 2% of statewide producers.

Harrington sees Zoo City as a pathway for the Black community to participate in both land ownership and the food economy — something she says is part of their cultural history.

“Black people came to America to tend the land, to be stewards of land, and we come from agrarian culture,” she said. “The fact that we cannot participate in the industry ecosystem in that way, it’s a travesty.”

For Harrington, being a steward of her own land isn’t just about the historical roots of her ancestors but also her immediate family and the agency its given her as a single mother.

Being able to literally get her hands dirty and grow her own food while teaching her daughter about the environment has been both empowering and therapeutic, she said.

In 2014, she began work on Tegan’s Hopeful Storybook Garden, named after her daughter. The Jackson Street community garden came to life two years later as a project of Harrington’s nonprofit The Urban Folk Art Exploratory.

The Storybook Garden is no longer operational but Harrington’s vision for the land and the neighborhood has taken new shape in the Zoo City project.

Throughout the Edison neighborhood Harrington has plans for a food cooperative, an educational space and a micro-nursery with raised planter beds for rent.

Through Zoo City, Harrington is looking to tackle equity in the food industry from a neighborhood, city and

The Ethereum based decentralized finance (DeFi) protocol Hippo Finance launches the first community governed hedge fund for anyone interested in investing in crypto farming tokens safely.

  • Team Hippo aims to set a new industry standard for DeFi farming protocols, as a result, all the code will be audited by two independent security firms before launch.
  • Hippo Finance is powered by a three token ecosystem, designed to provide farming operations that are sustainable and incentivizes holding HIPPO tokens long term.
  • Users decide how the decentralized hedge fund is spent through transparent on-chain voting: burn, invest in another project, or distribute as dividends.

London, October 9, 2020 – Hippo Finance, a liquidity mining platform on Ethereum, today announces the launch date of its community governed DeFi hedge fund. Users will generate returns from staking HIPPO tokens in various farming pools, along with growing the decentralized hedge fund which token holders decide to use as a collective.

How does it work?

Hippo Finance is powered by a three token ecosystem: HIPPO, Angry Hippo (aHIPPO), and Dark Hippo (dHIPPO). Each token has its separate use case which compliments each other through staking to form a powerful positive feedback loop. The Hippo tokenomics are designed to distribute all value captured by the protocol back to investors through community governance. Ultimately the mission is to provide a secure long-term farming platform for crypto investors with plans to scale onto Polkadot.

Once launched, the liquidity mining programs and hedge fund management will work as per the following diagram.

Users stake HIPPO tokens individually to earn aHIPPO as rewards, or can provide HIPPO/ETH liquidity on Uniswap to enjoy a x1.5 multiplier. Additionally, aHIPPO/ETH LP tokens can be staked to farm dHIPPO tokens. Stakers will earn 75% of rewards, 20% goes to the fund contract, and 5% is allocated

When Jennifer Rodriguez relocated to Philadelphia in the late ’90s, the once-bustling South Philly neighborhood of Italian Market was in decay.

“It was a place experiencing disinvestment, and many wondered what would become of what was a once-vibrant commercial corridor,” says Rodriguez, who is now the president of the Greater Philadelphia Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.

That was, she said, until a wave of Mexican immigrants arrived—along with their small businesses. “They saw opportunity where so many others saw vacancy and blight.”

Today, the area is vibrant, attracting residents and entrepreneurs, and is among the most desirable neighborhoods in Philadelphia. To Rodriguez, it’s emblematic of the Hispanic community’s penchant for hard work and entrepreneurialism — even amid the Covid crisis.

“Our community knows how to find opportunity where others may not. We have done it before; we can do it again,” she says.

Rodriguez points to some key statistics regarding Hispanics and entrepreneurship. Data shows that Hispanic and immigrant entrepreneurs start more businesses than native-born Americans, and tend to grow revenue more quickly than the economy as a whole.

Indeed, according to statistics from the Stanford Latino Entrepreneurship Initiative, between 2009-2019 the number of Latino business owners grew 34%, compared to 1% for all business owners in the United States. And between 2018-2019, Latino-owned businesses reported an average revenue growth of 14%, outpacing the growth of the U.S. economy.

In honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, we profile several Latino entrepreneurs in Philadelphia who like others around the country are working to strengthen their community and local business ecosystem.

From Argentina to Whole Foods

Silvia Lucci was not a born restaurateur —she became one by necessity and marketing wit. The Argentina native studied education and obtained a master’s degree in social and urban development in her native country, but found herself suffering

A township in Cape May County said it has scheduled a property tax sale in October to help recoup losses from state-ordered, coronavirus shutdowns and restrictions.

Ten of the 15 properties up for sale in Middle Township are in the Whitesboro area of the township, a community established in 1901 for Black settlers to own homes, especially to escape the violence and racial oppression in Jim Crow America. The sale has some community members wondering if their historic shore community will retain its identity as an area established primarily for people of color.

“This was an African-American safe haven,” said Shirley Green, a longtime resident and local historian. “For them to be tax selling is pretty-much running us out of our quality of life.”

But Green said she understands both sides of the issue. She owns nearly two dozen properties in Whitesboro, many of which are residential rentals. She said she has tried to work with tenants but the township hasn’t worked with her as a property owner who is also experiencing shortfalls.

The parcels that will be auctioned up range in size from a mobile home lot in a campground to a nearly 3-acre lot on Gibbs Street in a wooded area with no structure on it in Whitesboro. Three of the 15 parcels for sale have residential structures on them but none are occupied, a local official said.

The properties will be sold at auction on October 28 with opening bids ranging from $7,600 for a parcel on Matthews Street in Whitesboro to $83,400 for a lot with no structure on it in the 1100 block of Golf Club Road on the east side of the Garden State Parkway. Most of the township, including Whitesboro, is west of the Garden State Parkway.

“We have been preparing for some