Gov. Gary Herbert appointed Tanji Northrup as the Utah Insurance Department’s interim commissioner on Wednesday.

Northrup has held various leadership positions in the department for the past 12 years, including as Kiser’s deputy commissioner, and had a major role in implementing state and federal health care insurance reform. She also assisted in the development of Utah’s Small Business Health Options Program (SHOP) exchange, which provides a tax credit for small companies that contribute to their employees health premiums.

“Tanji has offered valuable advice to my office on insurance matters as deputy commissioner,” Herbert said in a news release. “Her expertise will be valuable in her new role, and I anticipate that the Insurance Department will continue to excel under her leadership.”

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The Wisconsin Office of the Commissioner of Insurance Mark Afable has charged former insurance agent, Timothy S. Bratley, with a number of violations of insurance law all targeting elderly consumers.

Bratley, also a licensed funeral director in northern Wisconsin, was accused of naming himself and his wife as the beneficiary of insurance policies that he sold to his elderly customers.

In one reported instance, Bratley befriended an elderly widower. The man had no living children and was estranged from his family. Bratley and his brother sold the man a life insurance policy to fund future funeral and burial expenses.

Six months later, Bratley allegedly had the man transfer ownership of his home and land to him via quit claim deed. That same day, the man signed a will naming Bratley the beneficiary of his estate and a power of attorney naming Bratley’s wife as the man’s general power of attorney. Five years later, Bratley reportedly sold the man an annuity and Bratley’s wife was named the primary beneficiary of that annuity.

In the final decision issued on Sept. 18, Afable found that Bratley engaged in unfair trade practices and made a misrepresentation in an application for insurance. The final decision ordered Bratley to forfeit to the state twice his commission for one self-dealing transaction and pay $1,000 per violation of insurance law. The total financial penalty to Bratley is $37,375 to the state. Afable also ordered that Bratley’s insurance license be permanently revoked.

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RALEIGH

Convicted billionaire campaign donor Greg Lindberg’s name is coming up a lot in the race for insurance commissioner. This year’s contest for the regulatory office is a rematch from 2016, with Republican incumbent Mike Causey facing the two-term Democrat he defeated four years ago: Wayne Goodwin, who’s now chairman of the N.C. Democratic Party.

Causey played an instrumental role in the bribery case, wearing a wire for federal investigators and recording conversations in which Lindberg, his associates and then-N.C. Republican Party Chairman Robin Hayes offered to bribe Causey with big campaign contributions in exchange for taking action that Lindberg sought for his insurance companies, according to court documents. Lindberg was recently sentenced to seven years in prison.

Goodwin was never accused of any criminal acts in the investigation. But he benefited from campaign contributions from Lindberg in 2016 — including a $500,000 donation to a PAC supporting Goodwin’s re-election — and he went to work for Lindberg’s company as a consultant for several months in 2017.

Goodwin said in a recent interview that Lindberg got “no special favors” from his office, and on insurance regulatory issues related to Lindberg’s companies, “I relied on the input from subject matter experts.”

Causey’s campaign is emphasizing Goodwin’s ties to Lindberg. A video ad posted on YouTube calls Goodwin “a fancy dancy politician who has made a living off politics … Wayne Goodwin is bought and paid for by Greg Lindberg.”

In an interview, Causey said voters should be concerned by Goodwin’s decision to accept Lindberg’s support in 2016. “If you have one entity that’s saying ‘we want to bankroll you,’ it raises a lot of red flags,” Causey said.

He said that when he took office, Department of Insurance employees told him they had concerns about how regulatory matters were handled

Convicted billionaire campaign donor Greg Lindberg’s name is coming up a lot in the race for insurance commissioner. This year’s contest for the regulatory office is a rematch from 2016, with Republican incumbent Mike Causey facing the two-term Democrat he defeated four years ago: Wayne Goodwin, who’s now chairman of the N.C. Democratic Party.

Causey played an instrumental role in the bribery case, wearing a wire for federal investigators and recording conversations in which Lindberg, his associates and then-N.C. Republican Party Chairman Robin Hayes offered to bribe Causey with big campaign contributions in exchange for taking action that Lindberg sought for his insurance companies, according to court documents. Lindberg was recently sentenced to seven years in prison.

Goodwin was never accused of any criminal acts in the investigation. But he benefited from campaign contributions from Lindberg in 2016 — including a $500,000 donation to a PAC supporting Goodwin’s re-election — and he went to work for Lindberg’s company as a consultant for several months in 2017.

Goodwin said in a recent interview that Lindberg got “no special favors” from his office, and on insurance regulatory issues related to Lindberg’s companies, “I relied on the input from subject matter experts.”

Causey’s campaign is emphasizing Goodwin’s ties to Lindberg. A video ad posted on YouTube calls Goodwin “a fancy dancy politician who has made a living off politics … Wayne Goodwin is bought and paid for by Greg Lindberg.”

In an interview, Causey said voters should be concerned by Goodwin’s decision to accept Lindberg’s support in 2016. “If you have one entity that’s saying ‘we want to bankroll you,’ it raises a lot of red flags,” Causey said.

He said that when he took office, Department of Insurance employees told him they had concerns about how regulatory matters were handled