DETROIT, MI — A Muskegon firm will pay $66,000 to the state of Michigan this month for violations of state environmental law following a major failure of the company’s Detroit dock, which collapsed into Detroit River last fall.

Revere Dock LLC owner Steve Erickson of North Muskegon has signed a settlement with the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes and Energy (EGLE) that outlines plans to restore and upgrade the site, which partly sank into the river on Nov. 26, 2019.

The state announced the settlement Oct. 12 and said Erickson has until summer to finish restoration work at the 5851 West Jefferson Avenue property. Upgrades include a new 600-foot steel seawall to replace the old wood and concrete dock that collapsed after a large pile of construction aggregate was placed near the shoreline.

The collapse initially sparked fears of contaminated drinking water because the site was used in the 1940s and 1950s for atomic bomb material development. Testing by the Great Lakes Water Authority and EGLE subsequently found no excessive levels of radioactivity.

EGLE and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency testing also found industrial contaminants in site soils and sediment at the site collapse, but not at excessive levels.

The site is the former location of Revere Copper and Brass Co., which operated there for more than 60 years. Erickson has owned the site since 2015 and leased it to Detroit Bulk Storage. It is located next to the Historic Fort Wayne property.

In January, the city of Detroit fined Revere Dock $10,000 for illegally storing limestone at the site without a permit.

Restoration plans follow months of back-and-forth between Revere Dock and EGLE, which called earlier work plans inadequate and directed improvements.

EGLE said Monday it has approved site plans following a June public hearing. Those plans call for

CLEVELAND, Ohio — One of the most contentious political debates in Northeast Ohio this year is not about the presidential election, control of the Senate or even the Ohio Statehouse corruption scandal.

It’s about zoning in Pepper Pike.

Hundreds of yard signs bearing the phrase “No to Mixed-Use” are scattered throughout the small, well-to-do far-eastern suburb. They line the sidewalk-less residential streets as part of an effort that opposition organizer Manny Naft said aims to keep the city’s “bucolic” nature.

The signs refer to a measure on the Nov. 3 ballot to change the zoning for a 68-acre tract of land owned by behavioral health services nonprofit Beech Brook, along with two smaller adjoining lots. The issue has divided the community.

The division resulted in online bickering, contentious town hall meetings, threats of defamation lawsuits and even unused condoms left at Axiom Development Principal Bryan Stone’s home.

Stone, who lives in Pepper Pike, announced last month that he and the project’s investors scrapped plans to buy and develop the property at Lander Road and Chagrin Boulevard with houses, townhouses, office space and retail. After a lot of planning, he blamed the rancor surrounding the project.

“We will not move forward and invest time and energy on an idea that has been completely removed from the realm of civil discourse,” he wrote in a Sept. 25 news release.

However, Pepper Pike voters still have a chance to vote on the zoning change in November’s election. The proposal remains on the ballot.

Beech Brook CEO Tom Royer said in an email that the nonprofit decided not to pull the measure when Stone backed out. Early voting began Tuesday.

Regardless, the organization is now out of a deal to sell a property it longer needs to carry out its mission. The nonprofit has

By Hadeel Al Sayegh and Davide Barbuscia

DUBAI, Oct 7 (Reuters)Just over six years ago, Dubai-listed Arabtec Holding ARTC.DU had investors eating out of its hands.

At a lavish shareholder meeting at Abu Dhabi’s St. Regis Hotel, the contractor that helped build the world’s tallest skyscraper, Dubai’s Burj Khalifa, outlined plans for listings in London, Hong Kong and New York.

Those plans never materialised. After capital injections between 2013 and 2017, management changes, layoffs and rounds of restructurings, Arabtec’s shareholders, which include Abu Dhabi state fund Mubadala, decided last week that the Gulf’s largest listed contractor should file for insolvency.

Arabtec had around $2.75 billion in total liabilities at the end of June, including almost $500 million in bank borrowing.

The liquidation, likely to lead to further layoffs in a company which had a 40,000 strong workforce at the end of last year, marks the end of an era of plentiful construction for local contractors.

“A great company that is 45 years old disappeared off the face of the earth. I find it extremely sad that an iconic company like that disappeared,” Ziad Makhzoumi, chief financial officer of Arabtec from September 2008 to March 2013, told Reuters.

The coronavirus, low oil prices and production cuts have battered the Gulf economies this year, but the collapse of construction giants like Arabtec and engineering group Drake & Scull International in the United Arab Emirates has deeper roots.

Industry sources, analysts, and bankers point to an unsustainable business model used by some contracting firms in the region.

They undercut competitors on pricing and sometimes cost a project at a discount to win a tender in the hopes of making a profit through additional work when it starts running.

STATE-BACKED CLIENTS

It’s a model that works on the premise that supply