BAY CITY, MI – Bay City’s South End is one step closer to becoming the new home of a state-of-the-art marijuana growing facility that promises to bring about 100 jobs to the area.

On Monday, Oct. 5, the Bay City Commission approved an Industrial Facilities Tax Exemption Certificate application for Shango Park Bay City Inc. to allow the company to rehabilitate a vacant 24,800-square-foot building located at 1601 Garfield. The approved IFT is for the total amount of $7 million for 12 years.

Shango’s proposed plan involves turning the empty building and its 5-acre property into a mixed-use facility for marijuana cultivation, processing and storage, with the possibility for corporate offices. The existing structure will primarily be used for cultivation and offices while additions are planned to include a bakery and extraction lab.

Construction is slated to start in Fall of 2020, with the first phase of construction estimated to be wrapped up in Spring 2021.

Shango’s website refers to itself as a leading medical and recreational medical dispensary license holder, grower and manufacturer in multiple states across the country. Shango currently has facilities and sells products in Oregon, Nevada and Washington, with the plan to strengthen Michigan as a new player in its roster. Shango currently has a medical marijuana provisioning center in Lapeer but the company has larger plans for the Bay City location.

Matt Kowalski of Warren-based Shango was in attendance at Monday’s meeting to clarify details for commissioners about the tax abatement and plans for the property.

In exchange for the tax exemption, Shango plans to revamp the property and add approximately 100 new jobs of varying skill level.

“We’ll have jobs anywhere from janitorial staff all the way up to PhD’s,” said Kowalski.

In addition, Kowalski stated that the company is planning a provisioning center

(This story has been updated with additional information.)

FLINT, MI — A federal lawsuit filed on behalf of Flint children claims three companies that helped finance Flint’s participation in the Karegnondi Water Authority are partly responsible for the city’s water crisis.

The lawsuit, filed Wednesday, Oct. 7, in U.S. District Court, says J.P. Morgan Chase & Co., Wells Fargo Bank National Association, and Stifel, Nicolaus, and Company, Inc., pushed ahead with bonding to finance construction of a new water pipeline to Lake Huron while knowing the city would use the Flint River as its short-term source of drinking water and of the resulting hazards to residents’ health.

Without the bond financing, Flint would not have been able to join the KWA and tap into its new pipeline, the lawsuit alleges, the KWA would not have been able to start construction of the project, and the city would never have switched its water source to the river.

Flint was initial partner in the KWA, agreeing to buy a set amount of raw water from the new pipeline, but unlike Genesee County, the other primary partner, the city stopped purchasing pre-treated water from the city of Detroit before the pipeline was built, switching instead to treating its own river water during parts of 2014 and 2015.

The city’s change in water source triggered the water crisis, sending highly corrosive water through the distribution system, including thousands of lead and galvanized service lines to homes, causing elevated levels of lead and bacteria in tap water.

State appointed emergency managers were charged with running the city’s affairs at the time bonding was secured for the pipeline project.

“J.P. Morgan Chase, Wells Fargo, and Stifel knew … that the Flint River would be used as an interim source of drinking water for Flint for the

Amid Hong Kong’s retail sales slump since last year’s social unrest, statistics have not shown favor to the city’s economic conditions, owing to the lack of tourism and continued political economy divide. The Census and Statistics Department revealed the total retail sales for August 2020 declined by 13.1% year-on-year, whereby the first eight months of the year saw a 30.2% negative in sales.

The largest category affected was of food and alcoholic drinks due to the third wave’s social distancing measures and dining regulations, which in effect spurred supermarket sales by 10.8% inspiring an additional uplift of 10.1% in electrical and other consumer durable goods for stay-at-home cooking. 

Yet, retailers and landlords have shown resilience as they had become well accustomed to the inevitable waves of Coronavirus cases causing suspension in several trades. Harbour City, the largest shopping mall in Hong Kong, felt the cold absence of Mainland Chinese tourists ever since the protests and the barring of overseas visitors due to COVID restrictions. Being a hot holiday destination for many, Hong Kong saw a staggering drop of 99% in tourism, causing many tourist-dependent locations and retail stores to shutter.

Localization Done Right

To tackle this, Harbour City turned its position around, shedding its tourist reputation with a new ‘Always Rewarding’ shopping campaign targeting residing Hong Kongers. Local shopping malls have had always initiated many promotions to encourage spending, but Harbour City’s strong discount offering was so incentivizing it had drawn over 360,000 shoppers over a weekend and all 2,200 parking lots filled – a figure that is acute to the shopping ambiance of the Christmas holidays.