(Bloomberg) — China’s government is expected to price a potential $6 billion bond sale as early as Wednesday, ahead of possible volatility from U.S. elections next month.

The Ministry of Finance is arranging investor calls for 144a and Regulation S senior bonds Tuesday, according to people familiar with the matter who aren’t authorized to speak publicly. The ministry is seeking to raise about $6 billion via multi-tranche notes that will likely include three-year, five-year, 10-year and 30-year maturities, Bloomberg reported last week.

Officials at the ministry weren’t immediately available to comment.

The planned bond sale follows the ministry’s jumbo global debt offerings in two currencies in November, when it sold $6 billion of dollar bonds and 4 billion euro notes. The former drew bumper demand with orders at more than triple the targeted size.



chart, treemap chart: Scarce Supply


© Bloomberg
Scarce Supply

China’s fresh sovereign debt sale this week comes as uncertainty ahead of the U.S. elections in November is beginning to weigh on investor sentiment with some analysts anticipating a pick-up in volatility.

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“By moving forward the USD bond auction to October, MOF will avert risks of facing less receptive market conditions and increased volatility due to the U.S. elections,” said Chang Wei Liang, a macro strategist at DBS Bank Ltd. in Singapore. With the Fed keeping policy rates near zero and yields hovering near record lows, China should see a significantly lower cost of funding across the curve compared to 2019, he added.

China’s Ministry of Finance hired 13 financial institutions for the sale that includes four Chinese firms, according to people familiar with the matter.

(Updates with chart after fourth paragraph, analyst comment in sixth paragraph)

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(Bloomberg) — Demand for cars in China continues to go from strength to strength, making the automobile market in Asia’s biggest economy a lone bright spot as the coronavirus pandemic puts a damper on sales in Europe and the U.S.



a group of people standing on top of a car: A customer speaks with a sales agent while standing between a Ford Motor Co. Everest sport utility vehicle (SUV), right, and a Mustang sports car on display at a Ford dealership in Shanghai, China, on Thursday, July 19, 2018. The fledgling U.S.-China trade war will take a toll on companies from both sides, with some tariffs in place and the potential to escalate into consumer boycotts.


© Bloomberg
A customer speaks with a sales agent while standing between a Ford Motor Co. Everest sport utility vehicle (SUV), right, and a Mustang sports car on display at a Ford dealership in Shanghai, China, on Thursday, July 19, 2018. The fledgling U.S.-China trade war will take a toll on companies from both sides, with some tariffs in place and the potential to escalate into consumer boycotts.

Deliveries of sedans, SUVs, minivans and multipurpose vehicles increased 7.4% in September from a year earlier to 1.94 million units, the China Passenger Car Association said Tuesday. That’s the third straight monthly increase, and it was driven by demand for SUVs. A fuller sales picture will be reported later in the day by the China Association of Automobile Manufacturers.

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With auto sales in the U.S. and Europe still impacted by the Covid-19 outbreak, reviving demand in China is proving a boon for international and domestic manufacturers. China is set to be the first country globally to bounce back to 2019 volume levels, albeit only by 2022, according to researchers including S&P Global Ratings.

Automakers worldwide have invested billions of dollars in China, the world’s top car market since 2009, where the middle class is expanding but penetration is still relatively low. Brands from countries such as Germany and Japan have weathered the pandemic better than their local rivals — the combined market share of Chinese brands fell to 36.2% in the first eight months from a peak of 43.9% in 2017.

Even as the market recovers, it may still record

(RTTNews) – The China stock market has finished higher in back-to-back sessions, surging more than 140 points or 4.4 percent along the way. The Shanghai Composite Index now sits just beneath the 3,360-point plateau and it’s got a positive lead again for Tuesday’s trade.

The global forecast for the Asian markets is upbeat, with tech shares expected to lead the way higher. The European markets were mixed and the U.S. bourse were broadly higher and the Asian markets are tipped to follow the latter lead.

The SCI finished sharply higher on Monday following gains from the financials, properties and oil and insurance companies.

For the day, the index soared 86.39 points or 2.64 percent to finish at 3,358.47 after trading between 3,286.11 and 3,359.15. The Shenzhen Composite Index surged 73.40 points or 3.31 percent to end at 2,289.36.

Among the actives, Industrial and Commercial Bank of China climbed 1.02 percent, while Bank of China collected 0.62 percent, China Construction Bank jumped 1.47 percent, China Merchants Bank rallied 3.81 percent, Bank of Communications advanced 1.10 percent, China Life Insurance soared 4.48 percent, Ping An Insurance surged 3.80 percent, PetroChina gained 1.21 percent, China Petroleum and Chemical (Sinopec) added 0.76 percent, China Shenhua Energy increased 0.97 percent, Gemdale spiked 2.40 percent, Poly Developments accelerated 2.30 percent and China Vanke gathered 1.00 percent.

The lead from Wall Street is broadly positive as stocks moved sharply higher on Monday, extending the strong upward move seen in recent sessions and sending the major averages to their best closing levels in a month.

The Dow jumped 250.62 points or 0.88 percent to finish at 28,837.52, while the NASDAQ surged 296.32 points or 2.56 percent to end at 11,876.26 and the S&P 500 perked 57.09 points or 1.64 percent to close at 3,534.22.

Technology stocks led the

By Yilei Sun and Brenda Goh



FILE PHOTO: The GM logo is pictured at the General Motors Assembly Plant in Ramos Arizpe, Mexico


© Reuters/DANIEL BECERRIL
FILE PHOTO: The GM logo is pictured at the General Motors Assembly Plant in Ramos Arizpe, Mexico


BEIJING (Reuters) – General Motors Co’s (GM) vehicle sales in China grew 12% over July-September versus the same period a year earlier, the Detroit automaker’s first Chinese quarterly sales growth in two years. The second-biggest foreign automaker in China by units – after Germany’s Volkswagen AG – said on Monday it delivered 771,400 vehicles in China in the third quarter. That followed a second-quarter fall of 5%.

GM has a Shanghai-based joint venture with SAIC Motor Corp Ltd making Buick, Chevrolet and Cadillac vehicles. It has another venture, SGMW, with SAIC and Guangxi Automobile Group, producing no-frills mini-vans and which has started manufacturing higher-end cars.

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China sales of mass-market brand Buick rose 26% in the third quarter, GM said in a statement. Sales of its mass-market Chevrolet marque fell 20% whereas those of premium brand Cadillac jumped 28%.

Sales of no-frills brand Wuling grew 26%, whereas those of mass-market Baojun vehicles tumbled 19%.

GM has seen its China sales suffer in a crowded market and slowing economy. To revive its fortunes, it wants electric vehicles (EVs) to make up over 40% of new launches over the next five years in China, where the government promotes greener cars.

The automaker’s Wuling Hong Guang MINI EV, a micro two-door EV with a starting price of 28,800 yuan ($4,200), was China’s biggest-selling EV in August.

GM’s sales in 2019 fell 15% from a year earlier to 3.09 million vehicles. The automaker delivered 3.65 million vehicles in 2018 and 4.04 million units in 2017.

(Reporting by Yilei Sun and Brenda Goh; Editing by Christopher Cushing and Jacqueline Wong)

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By Tom Westbrook



a group of people walking down the street: FILE PHOTO: Passersby wearing protective face masks walk past a screen displaying Nikkei share average and world stock indexes, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Tokyo


© Reuters/ISSEI KATO
FILE PHOTO: Passersby wearing protective face masks walk past a screen displaying Nikkei share average and world stock indexes, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Tokyo

SINGAPORE (Reuters) – Chinese stocks led Asian markets higher on Monday as investors bet on a steady recovery for the world’s no. 2 economy, though caution about the fate of U.S. stimulus kept the dollar firm and a central bank policy tweak unwound some of the yuan’s gains.

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MSCI’s broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan <.miapj0000pus> rose 0.8% to 2-1/2-year highs, buoyed by a 2% gain in Chinese blue chips <.csi300> and a 1.5% rise by Hong Kong’s Hang Seng index <.hsi>. Japan’s Nikkei <.n225> slipped 0.3% as investors fretted about corporate earnings. [.T]

“If capital is moving on relative growth rates, then China is looking quite attractive,” said Chris Weston, head of research brokerage Pepperstone in Melbourne. Equities are cheap, yields advantageous and the outlook solid, he said.

“From a virus perspective as well, we’re seeing concerns in Europe, while China is considered a quasi-safe haven.”

China has returned from an eight day Mid-Autumn festival with investors encouraged by a robust rebound in tourism and ebbing coronavirus cases.

Qingdao city said on Monday it will conduct COVID-19 tests for the entire population of more than 9 million people over five days after small number of new cases.

Elsewhere, in the U.S. midwest, infections are at record levels and the World Health Organization is urging fresh curbs for Europe.

Video: Potential US stimulus deal could impact global markets (ABC NEWS)

Potential US stimulus deal could impact global markets

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Coronavirus aid plans in the United States are also in disarray, with the Trump administration on Sunday calling on Congress to pass a stripped-down