From Women’s Health

  • Kate Hudson, 41, just showed off her abs in a pink underwear set on Instagram.

  • She shared the photo to raise awareness for Kit Undergarments’ initiative donating money to breast cancer research.

  • Kit is donating $1 to Women’s Cancer Research Fund for every post with #kitstokickcancer.

Underwear pics are pretty much a guaranteed way to grab attention on Instagram, but Kate Hudson just shared a snap with a twist: She’s posting it to help raise money for breast cancer research.

In a new post, the 41-year-old Fabletics co-founder is jumping into the air with her hands over her head. She’s wearing a pretty pink bra and high-waisted underwear set—and oh yeah, her abs look amazing.

“It’s breast cancer awareness month and I’m joining my friends @kitundergarments company to #kitstokickcancer 🎀,” the actress wrote in the caption. “Sending a HUGE hug to all the survivors, the fighters and the families who have had to sadly say goodbye to loved ones. We fight to see the end of breast cancer in our lifetime! Let’s do this 🎀💪🎀 $1 for every post with #kitstokickcancer will be donated to @wcrfcure (See @kitundergarments for more info).” She also threw this little nugget into the mix: “Voting in underwear is fun! So don’t forget if you have a mail in ballot to get it in as soon as possible 🗳.” (You can also donate directly to Women’s Cancer Research Fund here.)

Plenty of people in the comments wanted to know how Kate managed to jump that high (raises hand), but many others thanked her for using her social media platform to raise awareness and research funds.

While Kate clearly has a heart of gold, she’s also got abs and buns of steel. The Weight Watchers ambassador told Women’s Health last year

Gilead (GILD) has nailed HIV and HCV. It has long striven to build a powerful cancer franchise. Its adventurings in the thicket of cancer therapeutics during the early years of this decade have been painful to watch. Gilead’s 2017 Kite Pharma acquisition marked a break from its earlier efforts; it has its attractions, but is challenging to scale, as I will discuss. Gilead’s flurry of even more recent oncology deals shows a hearty appetite but a questionable palate.

The thesis of this article is that despite Gilead’s longstanding record of successes in so many endeavors, it has fallen well short of the mark in terms of building a commercially attractive cancer portfolio. This has not been for lack of effort, as I will show.

This article does not discuss Gilead’s 9/13/20 Immunomedics (IMMU) deal, which has strong coverage in several recent Seeking Alpha articles. It should, however, serve as a cautionary reference for investors before becoming too enthused about Gilead’s latest (in a very long string) cancer therapy acquisition endeavor.

Success in cancer therapeutics has not come easily to Gilead despite its long and arduous efforts

Gilead has a long, gnarly and undistinguished record in pursuit of cancer therapeutics. As best as I can tell, it began with its June 2010 acquisition of CGI Pharmaceuticals, followed by its December 2010 acquisition of Arresto Biosciences and its 2011 acquisition of Calistoga Pharmaceuticals.

Arresto’s contribution to Gilead’s cancer pipeline, simtuzumab (GS-6624), in treatment of pancreatic cancer failed its phase 2 trial in 2014. CGI, which brought Syk kinase inhibitors entospletinib, continued until Gilead terminated its phase 1/2 trial in Precursor cell lymphoblastic leukaemia-lymphoma in 2019.

Calistoga brought Cal-101 (idelalisib, GS-1101) to Gilead’s pipeline. Cal-101 is a PI3K inhibitor subtype thought to have improved safety and effectiveness over other PI3K inhibitors. In July

Rep. Katie Porter (D-Calif.) went viral this week after grilling former Celgene CEO Mark Alles over his compensation and the price of cancer drug Revlimid during a committee hearing.

Using her now-signature whiteboard board, Porter pointed out that the price of the drug, which is approved to treat the blood cancer multiple myeloma, has spiked from $412 per pill in 2005 to $763 per pill today. 

“I’m curious, did the drug get substantially more effective in that time? Did cancer patients need fewer pills?” Porter asked, after writing the price increases on a white board. 

The former CEO told the lawmaker that the manufacturing for the pill “would be the same” between 2005 and today.

“Did the drug start to work faster? Were there fewer side effects? How did you change the formula or production of Revlimid to justify this price increase?” Porter asked.

She also grilled Alles on his compensation and bonuses tied to the drug.

Porter noted that Alles was paid $13 million in 2017, which she said is “360 times what the average senior gets on Social Security.” She added that Alles received millions in bonuses tied to increases for the company and that he received $500,000 in bonuses due to the price increase for Revlimid.

“To recap here: The drug didn’t get any better, the cancer patients didn’t get any better, you just got better at making money, you just refined your skills at price gouging,” Porter continued.

Porter and Alles’s exchange immediately went viral across social media.

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Wednesday’s hearing

  • Rep. Katie Porter tore into Celgene CEO Mark Alles on Wednesday over price hikes on a cancer drug.
  • Porter grilled the CEOs of Teva, Celgene, and Bristol Myers Squibb as part of a House investigation into the pricing of Teva’s multiple-sclerosis drug Copaxone and Bristol Myers Squibb’s multiple-myeloma drug Revlimid.
  • During a Wednesday congressional hearing, Porter, a former consumer-protection attorney, used a whiteboard to illustrate points such as how much money the CEO made, how much a single pill of Revlimid cost over the years, and how much his bonus was as a result.
  • Alles confirmed that the manufacturing for the drug remained the same amid price increases but said the drug was approved for new uses.
  • “To recap here: The drug didn’t get any better, the cancer patients didn’t get any better — you just got better at making money, you just refined your skills at price gouging,” Porter replied.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Rep. Katie Porter of California grilled Celgene CEO Mark Alles on Wednesday over price hikes on a cancer drug that she said resulted in a bonus of half a million dollars for the pharma executive.

Alles appeared before the House oversight committee alongside the CEOs of Teva and Bristol Myers Squibb as part of a House investigation into the pricing of Teva’s multiple-sclerosis drug Copaxone and Bristol Myers Squibb’s multiple-myeloma drug Revlimid. Alles served as CEO of Celgene before it was acquired by Bristol Myers Squibb in 2019.

“Since launching Revlimid in 2005, Celgene raised the price of the drug 22 times, from $215 per pill to $719 per pill,” according to documents from the House oversight committee’s chairwoman, Rep. Carolyn Maloney. “After Bristol Myers Squibb obtained the rights to Revlimid last November, it raised the price of Revlimid again, to $763



a close up of a person talking on a cell phone: U.S. Representative Katie Porter (D-CA) speaks at a campaign town hall meeting with Democratic 2020 U.S. presidential candidate and U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) in Mason City, Iowa, U.S., January 11, 2020. Brian Snyder/Reuters


© Brian Snyder/Reuters
U.S. Representative Katie Porter (D-CA) speaks at a campaign town hall meeting with Democratic 2020 U.S. presidential candidate and U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) in Mason City, Iowa, U.S., January 11, 2020. Brian Snyder/Reuters

  • Rep. Katie Porter tore into Celgene CEO Mark Alles over price hikes on a cancer drug, during a congressional hearing on Wednesday.
  • Porter, alongside freshman congresswomen Rep. Rashida Tlaib and Rep. Ayanna Pressley, grilled the CEOs of Teva, Celgene, and Bristol-Myers Squibb as part of a House Oversight Committee investigation into the pricing of Teva’s Multiple Sclerosis drug Copaxone and Bristol-Myers Squibb’s multiple myeloma drug Revlimid. 
  • During the congressional hearing, Porter, a former consumer protection attorney, tore into Alles, writing key figures in her questions — such as how much the CEO makes, how much a single pill of Revlimid cost over the years, and how much his bonus was as a result — on a whiteboard to a striking effect.
  • “Did the drug start to work faster? Were there fewer side effects? How did you change the formula or production of Revlimid to justify this price increase?” Porter asked.
  • Alles confirmed that the manufacturing for the drug remained the same but said the drug was approved for new indications.
  • “To recap here: The drug didn’t get any better, the cancer patients didn’t get any better, you just got better at making money, you just refined your skills at price gouging,” Porter replied.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Rep. Katie Porter grilled Celgene CEO Mark Alles Wednesday over price hikes on a cancer drug, which she said resulted in a half-million bonus for the pharma executive.

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Alles appeared before the House Oversight Committee alongside the CEOs of Teva and Bristol-Myers Squibb as part of a House investigation into the