Metro Denver voters will fill seven seats on the Regional Transportation District’s board in the Nov. 3 election — likely thrusting a mix of new and returning officials into arguably the least enviable positions in local government these days.

They will join a 15-member Board of Directors that is guiding the transit agency through its biggest crisis in decades, as the coronavirus pandemic has sent ridership plunging and blown sizable holes in its budget. The triage likely will continue well into the next term, even as board members and RTD officials, including incoming CEO and General Manager Debra Johnson, hope to map out new strategies to grow ridership. They also will need to weigh equity challenges and reckon with RTD’s unfulfilled rail promises in some parts of the district.

All the while, the agency is facing intense scrutiny from state officials, community leaders and an outside advisory committee that’s undertaking a top-to-bottom review of the agency.

“This is a defining time for RTD,” said Denver City Councilman Chris Hinds. The agency’s success or failure will have a bearing on challenges as far-reaching as traffic congestion, economic development and climate change.

“I’m very interested in breaking Denver’s dependence on cars,” said Hinds, who represents neighborhoods in central Denver that are among the most heavily dependent on public transportation. “Obviously, ensuring that we have reliable, frequent, cost-effective transit is a critical component to that.”

Three incumbents are in contested races to represent RTD board districts that cover central and east Denver, several south suburbs and far-southeastern reaches that include Parker. Another incumbent is running unopposed, while three newcomers — including a couple former elected officials — face no competition in open seats, guaranteeing wins.

An eighth position was supposed to be on the ballot, but no candidate qualified. The director for District

Note: Gov. Steve Sisolak signed the Emergency Directive 033 adjusting the statewide standards on gatherings. The new directive adjusts the previous limitations on gatherings from 50 people to 250 people or 50 percent of the occupancy, whichever is less. This applies to both indoor and outdoor venues.

Q: In a homeowners association meeting late last year we were told that because of a high number of claims, they could no longer afford water damage insurance. Then a notice came out early January that as of Jan. 15 we have no water damage insurance on the property.

In June, we received ballots for our covenants, conditions and restrictions amendment to remove the $1,000 deductible on master insurance claims, and there is no new cap. We understand the $1,000 deductible is not practical today and have no issue with this. But it also has added language that says owners “benefiting from” repairs will be liable for deductibles on all master policies. Seems way too broad and arbitrary.

We’ve tried for months to push the board and have done research to find a solution but have been shut down. If the board continues to refuse to act in what we believe is our best interest, we feel we must remove them. I’ve been trying to get more information on the removal process if it comes to that.

Our HOA board discontinued all water damage insurance as of Jan. 15. We owners are at risk now for major liability in our common areas because our condo policies only cover wall insurance. (Although HOA did not warn us or recommend it, many of us have added max loss assessment to our condo policies to protect ourselves.) We have been unable to get the board to move on a solution and have been completely disregarded

Dwane Casey’s takeaways from Detroit Pistons bubble workouts

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Detroit Pistons owner and Platinum Equity Tom Gores stepped down from the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) Board of Trustees on Thursday night, following pressure from activists over his investment firm’s ownership of a prison telephone company.

In 2017, Platinum Equity acquired Securus — a company that operates private telephone systems in all 50 states for more than a million prisoners. Gores’ involvement in the prison telecom industry has been met with criticism by various activists, and came to a head in September.

WHAT’S NEXT: Pistons bubble workouts over but their work isn’t. Here’s what team has planned

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Last month, two Civil Rights non-profit groups, Colors of Change and Worth Rises, penned a letter to the LACMA calling for Gores’ dismissal. The gesture spurred a second letter supporting Gores’ dismissal that was signed by more than 200 artists and art supporters, some of whom have ties to the museum.

“Today, the board of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art made it clear that there is no seat at the table for prison profiteers,” Rashad Robinson, president of Color Of Change, said in a statement. “Thanks to this coordinated campaign, Tom Gores was finally removed from LACMA’s Board of Trustees as a result of his dealings in the prison industry. As owner of Securus, Gores has exploited incarcerated people and their families — who are overwhelmingly Black and low-income — with exorbitant fees for prison phone calls. We applaud this resignation, but in order to truly see justice done, Congress must act and approve the Martha Wright

A Regeneron executive and one of its directors sold $1 million worth of stocks two days after President Donald Trump announced he was taking their therapeutic, recent filings from the Securities and Exchange Commission reveal.



a sign on the side of a building: Regeneron Begins Human Trials Of Coronavirus Antibody Cocktail


© Michael Nagle
Regeneron Begins Human Trials Of Coronavirus Antibody Cocktail

Last Friday night, the White House announced that as part of Trump’s treatment for coronavirus, he had received Regeneron’s experimental antibody cocktail that has not passed formal trials or been approved by the Food and Drug Administration.

One day later, the president appeared in a video posted to his Twitter account about his treatment at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center.

“They gave me Regeneron,” he said, saying the company name instead of the treatment’s name, REGN-COV2. “It was like, unbelievable. I felt good immediately. I felt as good three days ago as I do now.”

At another point in the video he said that the therapeutics he was given were “miracles…we have things happening that look like they’re miracles coming down from God.”

“I think this was a blessing from God that I caught [the virus], I think it was a blessing in disguise,” Trump said in the video. “I caught it, I heard about this drug, I said, ‘Let me take it’ … and it was incredible the way it worked.”

“I call that a cure,” he said. “It’s a cure.”

After the video posted, Regeneron’s stock jumped over 3 percent in after-hours trading.

On Monday, when markets opened, Regeneron stock prices surged $33 to $598 a share. That day, Joseph Goldstein, who sits on the company’s board of directors, and SVP and Head of Commercial Marion McCourt exercised stock options that let them sell a total of 10,200 shares for a net profit of over $1 million. According to filings,

FAIRFIELD — The town is one step closer to accepting an additional $300,000 for the wastewater treatment plant hardening project, which aims to make the site more resistant to coastal flooding.

The Board of Finance unanimously approved a resolution to accept a Community Development Block Grant-Disaster Recovery at a recent meeting.

Town officials reached out to the state — which administers the grant for the federal government — to request more funding after contaminants were found at the plant during construction on the project, said Brian Carey, the acting director of the Public Works Department.

“The state was able to come up with additional funding for us in the amount of $300,000,” Carey said. “So, we’re just back in front of the Board of Selectmen and Board of Finance at this time to get the agreement signed so that we can acquire that (funding).”

In February, First Selectwoman Brenda Kupchick said the project would cost a total of $7.4 million but $3.33 million would be funded through a grant from the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development.


Carey said workers noticed oily water coming in from one of the excavations about six weeks into the work, which started in March and April. The water was tested and showed petroleum and PCBs.

“We actually ended up having to do soil testing, and the extent of that has just grown over time as we’ve discovered that there’s PCBs pretty much throughout the northeast corner of the site and, then, sporadically through the rest of the site,” Carey said, who has previously stated the contaminants are unrelated to the fill pile scandal.

The town is working with its licensed environmental professional, Tighe and Bond, as well as with the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency