Spain's Rafael Nadal celebrates winning the final match of the French Open tennis tournament against Serbia's Novak Djokovic in three sets, 6-0, 6-2, 7-5, at the Roland Garros stadium in Paris, France, Sunday, Oct. 11, 2020. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)

Christophe Ena/Associated Press

Rafael Nadal has had too many great moments at the French Open to count. This one may have been his best. 

Nadal destroyed Novak Djokovic in a 6-0, 6-2, 7-5 romp in Sunday’s French Open final, taking home his record 13th championship at Roland Garros and tying Roger Federer for the most Grand Slam championships in tennis history.

“What you’re doing on this court is unbelievable,” Djokovic said to Nadal on the court after the match. “Not just on this court, throughout your entire career you’ve been a great champion and today you showed why you’re King of the Clay. I’ve experienced it on my own skin.”

The Spaniard will take home a $1.9 million purse for his victory, with Djokovic bringing in $941,296. Darren Rovell of The Action Network had updated career earnings for Nadal, Federer and Djokovic.

While most favored Nadal in the hyped head-to-head, no one expected the straight evisceration that played out. Nadal knocked Djokovic out of sync from the opening game, with the Serb losing 6-0 in a Grand Slam final for the first time in his career.

The momentum never even came close to shifting in Djokovic’s favor. He broke Nadal just once in five opportunities while giving up seven breaks on 18 chances of his own. 

It was a quintessentially dominant performance from Nadal, making the world’s top-ranked player look like no tougher test than a first-round opponent.

Djokovic entered the final putting together one of the more impressive runs of tennis in recent history. He entered with a 37-1 overall record for the season, with that one loss

Spain's Rafael Nadal plays a shot against Argentina's Diego Schwartzman in the semifinal match of the French Open tennis tournament at the Roland Garros stadium in Paris, France, Friday, Oct. 9, 2020. (AP Photo/Michel Euler)

Michel Euler/Associated Press

Novak Djokovic and Rafael Nadal will meet for the ninth time in a Grand Slam final Sunday at the 2020 French Open. 

The two legendary players have not met in a title clash at a major since the 2019 Australian Open. Most of their head-to-head showdowns in Grand Slam finals occurred at the start of their reigns atop the men’s game alongside Roger Federer.  

Nadal is chasing after his 20th overall major and 13th crown on the clay at Roland Garros, while Djokovic is trying to capture his second title in Paris and 18th overall major. 

As he typically does in Paris, Nadal dominated his first six matches on the path to the final, as he won every set. 

Djokovic faced more difficulties in the previous two rounds, and he will enter at a disadvantage based off those recent struggles and Nadal’s career-long form on clay.

           

French Open Men’s Final Information

Start Time: 9 a.m. ET

TV: NBC

Live Stream: NBC Sports app or NBCSports.com

Prize Money: Winner earns $1.88 million

      

Prediction

Rafael Nadal over Novak Djokovic

All of the statistics in Nadal’s favor suggest the Spaniard will come away with his 13th Roland Garros title. 

Nadal is 17-7 against Djokovic on clay courts and 6-1 versus the Serbian at the French Open. 

Although the numbers are overwhelmingly in Nadal’s favor, he admitted that he must play a solid match against Djokovic, per ATPTour.com.

“The only thing I know is to play against Novak, I need to play my best. Without playing my best tennis, [the] situation is very difficult. I know that it’s a court that I have been playing well on for such a long time, so that helps. But at the same time, he has an amazing record here too. [He’s] one of the

Ben Pursell for Blizzard Entertainment

With a 4-2 win over the Seoul Dynasty, the San Francisco Shock have won the Overwatch League Grand Finals in consecutive seasons and cemented themselves as the greatest team in Overwatch history. 

While the sample size is too small for the “dynasty” moniker to be slung around, the Shock’s organizational culture warrants praise. After winning 2019’s championship, partly on the back of play from that season’s MVP, Sinatraa, and his fellow DPS, Architect, San Francisco was without both players in 2020’s playoffs.

As other teams have tried rotating starters, no team has found success doing so quite like the Shock. With Sinatraa leaving to pursue a professional career in Valorant and Architect being transferred to the Hangzhou Spark, both midseason, the organization’s next-man-up mantra paid dividends as midseason acquisition ANS slid into the lineup and helped carry the team to a cool $1.5 million in Grand Finals winnings.

When asked about that ability to rotate players seamlessly, the team’s main support, Moth, offered a simple explanation: “Shock’s always been a team that feels like we don’t really have bench players. Everyone has a role.”

Primarily running ANS and Striker at DPS with Moth and Viol2t on support, head coach Crusty rotated his tank line, complementing ChoiHyoBin with both Smurf and Super during their tightly contested playoff run. Here’s how the final four shook out, followed by the biggest plays and moments from the year’s most important match.

         

Thursday, October 8

Seoul Dynasty 2-3 San Francisco Shock

Philadelphia Fusion 0-3 Shanghai Dragons

         

Friday, October 9

San Francisco Shock 3-2 Shanghai Dragons

Seoul

Sofia Kenin of the U.S. plays a shot against Petra Kvitova of the Czech Republic in the semifinal match of the French Open tennis tournament at the Roland Garros stadium in Paris, France, Thursday, Oct. 8, 2020. (AP Photo/Michel Euler)

Michel Euler/Associated Press

Sofia Kenin is the third different American woman to reach the French Open final in the last five years. 

On Saturday, the No. 4 seed will try to win on the Paris clay, which is what Serena Williams in 2016 and Sloane Stephens in 2018 failed to do. 

Kenin is attempting to become the first American singles champion at Roland Garros since Williams in 2015. 

Standing in the way of her second-career major victory is Iga Swiatek, a 19-year-old Polish player that has taken the event by storm.

Swiatek is one of two players left in the tournament in either singles draw that has not lost a set yet. The other is Rafael Nadal, who is a 12-time champion at Roland Garros. 

                    

French Open Women’s Final Information

Start Time: 9 a.m. ET

TV: NBC

Prize Money: $1.88 million to the winner

      

Prediction

Sofia Kenin over Iga Swiatek

Although Kenin’s set record at Roland Garros is worse than Swiatek’s, she carries a significant edge in experience.

Kenin won her first Grand Slam final appearance at the Australian Open and has been beaten just once in  major tournaments this season. 

Her handling of the moment and overall form could help her take the first sets off Swiatek at Roland Garros. 

The American comes into the women’s singles final off two controlling performances. The first was in the third set against Danielle Collins in which she did not concede a game. She followed that up with a straight-set win over her only seeded opponent, Petra Kvitova. 

Kenin admitted after the win over Kvitova that she is playing some of her best tennis, per ESPN.com’s D’Arcy Maine.

“It took some time for me to get my motivation back,” Kenin said.. “I finally got it. I feel like I’m playing the best

FILE - In this Jan. 24, 2018, file photo, Larry Nassar, a former doctor for USA Gymnastics and member of Michigan State's sports medicine staff, sits in court during his sentencing hearing in Lansing, Mich. MSU is defending itself against a second wave of lawsuits related to Nassar but says it wants to reach a deal with the additional assault victims. MSU defended itself in a court filing Monday, Aug. 26, 2019. It says it's immune to liability for Nassar's crimes, no matter how

Carlos Osorio/Associated Press

The U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Committee reportedly filed a lawsuit in a Colorado district court on Thursday against its insurance carriers, claiming they are delaying payments stemming from the Larry Nassar sexual abuse fallout.

Nancy Armour and Tom Schad of USA Today reported the news, noting the USOPC has not reached a settlement with the more than 500 girls and young women who sued the organization and USA Gymnastics because they said they were sexually abused by Nassar or others within the sport. 

Mediation has lasted approximately a year and a half, and USOPC said the 11 insurance companies it is using have “failed to honor their promises,” which has delayed any settlement payments.

“This lawsuit seeks to have a court resolve the issues related to the insurers’ obligations, as part of our efforts to achieve a fair resolution for the victims and survivors,” board chair Susanne Lyons said.

Armour and Schad explained the lawsuits filed by the survivors against USA Gymnastics and the USOPC were put on hold in December 2018 when USA Gymnastics filed for bankruptcy, but the organization must reach a settlement agreement or the lawsuits can resume.

As part of the lawsuit against the insurance carriers, the USOPC denied responsibility for Nassar and said it took out the insurance policies so it didn’t have to pay the claims to survivors and could continue funding other athletes.

Armour and Schad also noted on Aug. 24 the USOPC joined a joint motion filed on Aug. 20 by USA Gymnastics and the survivors that said the insurance carriers were stalling settlement negotiations “for their own economic benefit.” 

In 2018, Nassar, who was a former USA Gymnastics and Michigan State University physician, was sentenced to 40 and 175 years in prison.