BAY CITY, MI – Bay City’s South End is one step closer to becoming the new home of a state-of-the-art marijuana growing facility that promises to bring about 100 jobs to the area.

On Monday, Oct. 5, the Bay City Commission approved an Industrial Facilities Tax Exemption Certificate application for Shango Park Bay City Inc. to allow the company to rehabilitate a vacant 24,800-square-foot building located at 1601 Garfield. The approved IFT is for the total amount of $7 million for 12 years.

Shango’s proposed plan involves turning the empty building and its 5-acre property into a mixed-use facility for marijuana cultivation, processing and storage, with the possibility for corporate offices. The existing structure will primarily be used for cultivation and offices while additions are planned to include a bakery and extraction lab.

Construction is slated to start in Fall of 2020, with the first phase of construction estimated to be wrapped up in Spring 2021.

Shango’s website refers to itself as a leading medical and recreational medical dispensary license holder, grower and manufacturer in multiple states across the country. Shango currently has facilities and sells products in Oregon, Nevada and Washington, with the plan to strengthen Michigan as a new player in its roster. Shango currently has a medical marijuana provisioning center in Lapeer but the company has larger plans for the Bay City location.

Matt Kowalski of Warren-based Shango was in attendance at Monday’s meeting to clarify details for commissioners about the tax abatement and plans for the property.

In exchange for the tax exemption, Shango plans to revamp the property and add approximately 100 new jobs of varying skill level.

“We’ll have jobs anywhere from janitorial staff all the way up to PhD’s,” said Kowalski.

In addition, Kowalski stated that the company is planning a provisioning center

SAN FRANCISCO — A California man convicted five years ago of defrauding several local governments in the state has been charged with trying to steal $22 million from the Paycheck Protection Program.

Attila Colar, 48, of Richmond, who goes by several aliases including Dahood Sharieff Bey, was charged with bank fraud in an alleged scheme where he falsified documents to take advantage of the federal program intended to keep small businesses afloat during the coronavirus pandemic, the U.S. Attorney’s Office in San Francisco said Friday.

Colar faces up to 30 years in prison and a $1 million fine if convicted.

Prosecutors sought to keep him detained in jail while the case is prosecuted by telling the court that Colar tried to destroy records related to PPP applications by flushing them down the toilet when investigators executed a search warrant at his home in Hercules.

According to a criminal complaint, he submitted nine loan applications, including three for All Hands on Deck, a nonprofit he founded to offer services to people released from jail or prison, and received $1.1 million from one of those applications. Prosecutors said he falsified payroll tax documents to make it look like he was paying employees in excess of $22 million, when there were no W2 forms to back up the claim.

None of the loan money was spent, defense attorney Patrick Hanly wrote in a motion arguing for Colar’s release.

“This is a no loss paper crime. A fraud case involving allegations of false statements on a loan application,” Hanly wrote. “The loan proceeds sat in the defendant’s account for over 2 weeks before being seized by the FBI.”

The East Bay Times reports Colar was the leader of a Black Muslim temple in Oakland and a group that was a spinoff of Your Black

He started as a cook in the Michelin-starred Antonio Restaurant, and then quickly rose through the ranks to become head chef in just three years. “The opportunities are definitely better in Macau as many hotels, casinos and resorts have opened here,” said the 31-year-old.

Last year, he was the given the task of opening Paulaner Brahaus, a franchised German restaurant in the former Portuguese colony. Tavares was on track to open in late January when the Covid-19 outbreak in China brought tourism to a standstill, disrupting plans and pushing back the opening of the 150-seat outlet by nearly a year to December.

Get the latest insights and analysis from our Global Impact newsletter on the big stories originating in China.

Tavares’ predicament and those linked to the city’s tourism industry show that Macau’s reliance on gaming, tourism and affiliated services is hurting its economy as it accounted for 70 per cent of its revenues in the first eight months of this year.

Macau needs to move quickly to diversify its economy to provide new job opportunities and income sources for its growing population, especially in light of the havoc wrecked to its mainstay tourism industry by the coronavirus pandemic, say analysts and veteran businessmen.

Just before the Covid-19 pandemic derailed the city’s economy, Beijing announced a raft of policies in December last year aimed at diversifying Macau’s economy and forging closer integration with the Greater Bay Area by building its financial services industry, while maintaining its position as a leading gaming and tourism centre.

President Xi Jinping, during his three-day visit to Macau in December last year to mark the 20th anniversary of its return from Portuguese to Chinese rule, backed the city to develop into a service platform for commercial and trade cooperation between China and Portuguese-speaking countries. Xi

Narragansett Bay Insurance Company (NBIC) began writing property and casualty insurance in Delaware and Maryland, effective Oct. 1, 2020.

The two states mark the seventh and eighth states where the company provides homeowners insurance. NBIC already provides homeowners insurance in Rhode Island, Connecticut, Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey, and Virginia.

Residents of Delaware and Maryland will have access to NBIC’s insurance products through a network of local independent agents.

NBIC recently hired David Lynch of Baldwin, Md., to join the company as assistant vice president, Territory Manager of Delaware and Maryland. Lynch has over 20 years of experience in the insurance industry, most recently as Maryland Territory manager for Cumberland Insurance Group. At NBIC, Lynch will be responsible for building the company’s distribution partner platform and managing all aspects of the territory as the company expands into these states.

Narragansett Bay Insurance Company, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Heritage Insurance Holdings, Inc., offers specialty insurance services and products to homeowners through an extensive network of independent agents along the Eastern Seaboard.

Heritage Insurance Holdings, Inc. is a super-regional property and casualty insurance holding company. Through its insurance subsidiaries and a large network of agents, the company writes approximately $1 billion of gross personal and commercial residential premium across its multi-state footprint.

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A Tampa Bay Lightning fan whom police called on for screaming “shoot!” at the television during the Stanley Cup Final is using the misunderstanding to help raise money for domestic violence organizations.

Devon Garnett, 26, was watching Wednesday’s Game 3 of the Lightning-Dallas Stars series at a friend’s third-floor apartment in Tampa, Forida. The three fans were energized after Lightning star Steven Stamkos, playing in what turned out to be his only game of the postseason due to injury, scored an early goal.

On an ensuing power play, a fired-up Garnett recalled watching Lightning defenseman Victor Hedman hold the puck for too long.

“I was yelling, ‘Shoot! Shoot!’ because sometimes we get too cute with the puck,” he said.

This prompted his neighbor downstairs to call the Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office, believing there was a domestic dispute involving a firearm. According to sheriff’s office spokesperson Natalia Verdina, four deputies were dispatched to the apartment at 8:24 p.m. after the call. When police showed up, Garnett said they asked where “the guns were” because they were told there was a domestic dispute.

The fans explained the misunderstanding, opening the apartment door wide to show that the game was on television and showing them that they were decked out in Lightning gear.

“My exact words [to them] were, ‘We’re just cheering for Steven Stamkos,'” Garnett said. “They completely understood. Didn’t give us a hard time at all. The whole interaction, from when my friend answered the door and realizing it was the cops to them leaving, was maybe two minutes.”

The story spread among Tampa media and soon went viral, to the point where the Lightning invited Garnett and his friends to watch Game 4 of the Stanley Cup Final at a party inside Amalie Arena. Garnett, who works in