DENVER (AP) — Filings with the Colorado Division of Insurance indicate the monthly cost of health insurance bought through the state’s exchange is expected to drop an average of 1.4% next year.

Costs depend on where someone lives, though, The Denver Post reported Thursday. Residents in some counties on the Eastern Plains will see 12% increases in their monthly premiums, while Park County residents could pay 12% less, on average.

In Denver, the average premium will drop 1.2%, though surrounding counties will see even bigger decreases.

The Post reports that the average can conceal significant differences among companies, however, and customers should consider the trade-off between higher premiums and higher out-of-pocket costs.


State officials estimate premiums will be about 20.8% lower than they would have been without the reinsurance program, which acts as a backstop for insurers by reimbursing some of the cost of covering customers with higher medical bills.

Adam Fox, deputy director of the Colorado Consumer Health Initiative, said reinsurance has helped, but it could be hard to find an affordable plan in the 10 counties where only one insurer is selling on the exchange.

Premiums in the small-group market, which isn’t affected by reinsurance, will rise about 3.8%. The small group market is open to businesses with no more than 100 employees.

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The monthly cost of insurance bought through the exchange in Colorado will drop an average of 1.4% next year, according to filings with the Colorado Division of Insurance.

Your costs depend on where you live, though. Some counties on the Eastern Plains will see 12% increases in their monthly premiums, while Park County residents could pay 12% less, on average.

In Denver, the average premium will drop 1.2%, though surrounding counties will see bigger decreases. The average can conceal significant differences among companies, however, and customers have to consider the trade-off between higher premiums and higher out-of-pocket costs when they need care.

State officials estimated premiums will be about 20.8% lower than they would have been without reinsurance. The reinsurance program acts as a backstop for insurers, so they’re reimbursed some of the cost of covering customers with higher medical bills. It’s not clear what will happen to that program if the Supreme Court overturns the Affordable Care Act, because the law included a provision allowing states to experiment with ways to lower premiums, including reinsurance.

Adam Fox, deputy director of the Colorado Consumer Health Initiative, said reinsurance has helped, but it may be difficult to find an affordable plan in the 10 counties where only one insurer is selling on the exchange.

“Unfortunately, some carriers are still increasing rates in some areas, and any rate increase during this public health crisis is too much for many Coloradans who are already struggling,” he said in a news release.

Gov. Jared Polis said more needs to be done to lower the cost of health care. It’s not clear what might gain traction when the Legislature returns next year, however, since proposals for sweeping changes were derailed by the pandemic.

“My administration is committed to helping save people money even more on

Analysts say affluent consumers are taking advantage of favorable interest rates to purchase bigger, more feature-heavy vehicles during the pandemic

SANTA MONICA, Calif., Oct. 1, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Consumers in the market for a new car during the pandemic aren’t shying away from making bigger down payments than usual. According to the car shopping experts at Edmunds, the average down payment for a new vehicle climbed to $4,457 in the third quarter, compared to $3,891 last quarter and $4,045 a year ago. Edmunds data also shows that the average transaction price (ATP) for new vehicles rose significantly in the third quarter. Edmunds estimates that the ATP in Q3 climbed to $39,303, compared to $38,893 last quarter and $37,207 in Q3 of 2019.

Car-buying platform Edmunds.com serves nearly 20 million visitors each month. With Edmunds.com Price Promise(R), shoppers can buy smarter with instant, upfront prices for cars and trucks currently for sale at over 10,000 dealer franchises across the U.S.
Car-buying platform Edmunds.com serves nearly 20 million visitors each month. With Edmunds.com Price Promise(R), shoppers can buy smarter with instant, upfront prices for cars and trucks currently for sale at over 10,000 dealer franchises across the U.S.

Due to increases in average down payments and average transaction prices for new vehicles, Edmunds data shows that average loan terms and monthly payments decreased slightly in the third quarter compared to the second quarter. The average annual percentage rate (APR) for new vehicles saw a small lift, hitting 4.6% in Q3 compared to 4.2% in Q2.

“It’s clear that consumers who are purchasing vehicles right now are feeling quite secure in their financial position despite the pandemic. The discouraging unemployment numbers we’re seeing across the country likely aren’t reflective of the Americans in the new car market,” said Jessica Caldwell, Edmunds’ executive director of insights. “New-car shoppers are putting down more money and taking advantage of continued  low interest rates to upsize either to bigger vehicles or vehicles with more amenities.”

Edmunds analysts note that some of

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Forget the chaos of the first presidential debate—it’s the chaos surrounding the last-ditch efforts at a Covid-relief bill that’s really causing the market consternation.

You wouldn’t know it from just looking at where the stock market finished. The

Dow Jones Industrial Average

gained 329.04 points, or 1.2%, to 27781.70, while the

S&P 500

rose 0.8% to 3363.00, and the

Nasdaq Composite

advanced 0.7% to 11167.51.

Given that the market was deep in the red in the early hours of the morning, we’re happy to take an up day like that. But it could have been so much better. At its peak, the Dow was up more than 573.67 points, a result of comments made by Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin’s optimistic comments about a possible relief bill. Senator Mitch McConnell, however, threw cold water on the possibility of a deal, and the Dow shed 250 points.

“The conversation will continue, but will it be enough to get the Senate to move?” asks Evercore ISI’s Dennis DeBusschere. “This is really tough to game out. Would say that it doesn’t look dead, but Trump is going to have to push McConnell / Senate it seems.”

That it finished the day higher was likely due to positive economic releases, including better-than-expected Chicago Purchasing Managers’ Index and ADP jobs releases, and another big jump in pending home sales. And with the official payrolls report due Friday, and more negotiations on a relief package still to come, the last two days of the week could be pretty wild.

“Today’s volatile session was likely the start of a three-day ‘trade-fest’ as the second half of the week looks at least as action-packed,” writes Gorilla Trades strategist Ken Berman. “The slew of bullish economic releases, the heated presidential debate, and the rampant stimulus-related speculation led to