Co-Founder & Co-CEO at Drip Capital, defining the strategic vision and overseeing product, business development and global operations.

International trade has increasingly become a key force behind global GDP growth. With steady increases in transaction size as well as payment periods, a lot of this trade has become reliant on trade finance facilitation by lenders. In fact, up to 80% of international trade requires some kind of financing.

Since the earliest days of commerce, trade has primarily been financed by institutions and individuals with deep pockets. These financial institutions have been focused heavily on financing large businesses and trading companies that have a reasonable assurance of success.

As a result, small and medium-sized businesses (SMBs) have been left out of the trade finance circuit, despite contributing significantly to global trade. The Asian Development Bank estimated that nearly 45% of SMB trade finance applications are rejected by banks and traditional lenders.

However, a new class of financier has stepped up to the plate in recent years, in the form of alternative finance providers. Data-driven and agile, these fintech firms (to include our own) are pushing to close the gap, relying on technology to break the barriers faced by traditional lenders in servicing SMBs. The success of these newer players in originating high volumes and strong credit quality — key requirements for institutional investors —has resulted in the resurgence of a particular investment asset: trade finance receivables.

The Return Of The Trade Receivable

In a cross-border transaction, there are two parties: an exporter and an importer (i.e., a buyer). A third party (a financier) is introduced when one party needs advance payments. When an exporter generates an invoice against an order from a buyer, with the expectation the buyer will pay that invoice, that invoice is a trade receivable. The

  • Top brass from JPMorgan and BlackRock, among the firms to kick off earnings season with their results, said Tuesday that they expect more consolidation in the wealth- and asset-management industries.
  • Pressures on money managers have fueled a flurry of acquisitions in those areas this year, and analysts questioned executives about their own deal ambitions, albeit coming from different corners of the market. 
  • JPMorgan boss Jamie Dimon said the bank would be “very interested” in deals in that space, and BlackRock finance chief Gary Shedlin said the firm was focused on targets that could expand its technology, global distribution, and private markets capabilities.
  • Last week, Morgan Stanley said it would buy investment manager Eaton Vance in a deal valued at $7 billion just days after it closed on its E-Trade acquisition. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Top brass at the world’s largest asset manager and largest US bank told analysts on Tuesday that they expect more mergers and acquisitions in the wealth- and asset-management industries, and signaled both firms are on the prowl. 

On the back of Morgan Stanley’s $7 billion deal for Eaton Vance last week, analysts peppered JPMorgan and BlackRock executives with questions about their appetites for deals during their respective third-quarter calls, which helped kick off the latest earnings season. 

“Well, since we have you all on the line, our doors, our lines are wide open. We would be very interested, and we do think you’ll see consolidation of the business,” JPMorgan Chief Executive Jamie Dimon said. 

“But we’re not going to be more specific than that,” he said, adding there were considerations around what type of deal would make sense for the largest US bank by assets, like technology, product, and execution. 

Dimon emphasized early this year that he was interested in carrying out more

Outside the Bank of Japan (BOJ) headquarters in Tokyo on Sept. 14.

Photographer: Kiyoshi Ota/Bloomberg

The Bank of Japan’s escalating presence in almost every corner of the nation’s financial markets threatens to further distort activity and complicate any future pulling back from stimulus.

The central bank’s growing pile of assets has now reached the equivalent of 137% of gross domestic product, according to a Bloomberg calculation based on official data. In dollar terms, the tally of securities, loans and other assets is just 8% smaller than the Federal Reserve’s even though the U.S. economy is four times bigger than Japan’s.

While economists laud the relative success of the BOJ’s measures to support businesses and the economy through the Covid-19 crisis, many of them also warn that accelerated growth in the bank’s asset mountain will be hard to scale back in the future without unnerving investors and shocking loan-dependent companies and policy makers.

With its array of corporate debt and commercial paper quickly building, the BOJ’s “whale in the pond” presence is also spreading beyond government bonds and stock funds to distort other markets and further crowd out private investors.

“It’s like the BOJ has created an intensive care unit and wheeled everybody inside. It’s so comfortable on the drip feed that no one wants to leave,” said Takahiro Sekido, chief Japan strategist at MUFG Bank Ltd.

BOJ's asset haul is larger than Fed's by the size of an economy

The BOJ aggressively ramped up its lending and asset buying in March as the looming scale of the pandemic spread jitters among investors and businesses.

Given the already bloated size of the BOJ’s assets, the pace of increase appeared smaller in scale than its global peers, especially compared with the Federal Reserve. That partly reflects the Fed’s efforts to trim back earlier stimulus, something the BOJ was unable to do and

The coronavirus crisis and Anadarko’s acquisition have been weighing on Occidental Petroleum’s stock (NYSE: OXY) since the beginning of the year. With the stock down by a staggering 76%, is it the right time to take a closer look? The company’s cash position deteriorated through the first and second quarters as the declining benchmark prices dragged down operating margins. Occidental ended the June quarter with $1 billion of cash, but its short-term debt stood much higher at $2.4 billion. While long-term equity returns depend on the company’s strategy to manage its huge debt pile of $36 billion, Trefis believes that the ongoing asset sales are likely to provide an uptick to the stock and boost investor sentiments.

In order to address near-term debt maturities, the company has entered into purchase and sale agreements to divest Wyoming, Colorado, and Utah assets for $1.3 billion and its Colombia assets for $825 million. As the transactions are expected to close during the fourth quarter, the company will achieve its $2 billion asset divestiture target for 2020.

Occidental Petroleum’s revenues increased by 60% from $13.2 billion in 2017 to $21.2 billion in 2019, primarily driven by Anadarko’s acquisition and augmented by increased production & stable benchmark prices.

While the company has seen steady revenue growth over recent years, its P/S multiple has declined. The increased debt load and macroeconomic weakness have been key factors behind the falling stock price as interest expenses zoomed from $0.4 billion in 2018 to $1.06 billion in 2019 – taking the net income margin to negative territory. With a series of asset sales on the cards,

(Bloomberg) — Nippon Telegraph & Telephone Corp.’s 4.25 trillion yen ($40 billion) buyout of wireless unit NTT Docomo Inc. will make it easier for the recombined company to sell assets, generate enough cash to deliver dividends and repay debt incurred from financing the deal, Chief Executive Officer Jun Sawada said.



a man wearing a suit and tie: NTT CEO Jun Sawada Interview


© Bloomberg
NTT CEO Jun Sawada Interview

The merger will also help the Tokyo-based telecommunications giant keep up share buybacks and invest aggressively overseas, Sawada said in an interview. Greater cost savings as well as sales and securitization of real estate, data centers and other assets will deliver enough cash to revamp the business while rewarding shareholders and boosting its overseas portfolio, according to him.

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“We want to make our existing assets more liquid and use that to invest in new businesses,” he said Tuesday.

The merger between the telecommunications behemoths effectively ends an experiment that started in 1998 when NTT sold Docomo shares in the biggest-ever initial public offering at the time. It gave investors a chance to bet on the fast-growing sector, while Docomo executives went on a buying spree overseas, using the influx of cash to extend Japan’s then-lead in mobile services to the rest of the world. Even though they blew billions of dollars on minority stakes in carriers that eventually failed to deliver on their promise, NTT will keep pushing to expand overseas, Sawada said.

“We want Docomo to invest abroad again,” Sawada said, adding that he wants Docomo to work closely with NTT Communications, the network and cloud division of NTT, on an overseas strategy. “But it depends on how it’s done,” he said.

NTT shares rose 3.3% on Wednesday, the most in almost two months and outpacing other telecommunications stocks in Tokyo.

Sawada has already made clear that he wants to