“The biggest challenge was using what was already here but making it better,” says Tiffany (left). “This isn’t our forever home, so I had to be really smart about what I decided to spend money on and what just needed a small facelift. It’s way easier to bring your full vision to life without any restrictions, but the fun part is figuring it out with those limitations.”

“The biggest challenge was using what was already here but making it better,” says Tiffany (left). “This isn’t our forever home, so I had to be really smart about what I decided to spend money on and what just needed a small facelift. It’s way easier to bring your full vision to life without any restrictions, but the fun part is figuring it out with those limitations.”

When interior designer Tiffany Thompson bought this two-bedroom Portland, Oregon, town house in 2016, she was working at Nike and viewed its close proximity to the company’s headquarters as a major benefit. It also didn’t hurt that she had access to a community pool and tennis court, or that the drive toward her street was lined with towering trees. But the deciding factor, Tiffany remembers, is that it had a certain Pacific Northwest luxury. “What initially drew me to this place was the amount of natural light it received. It’s pretty bright all of the time,” Tiffany says. “Coming from Miami where it’s usually sunny, the thing that scared me most about purchasing a home in Portland was that it was going to be dark and rainy seven months out of the year.”

The challenge would be turning this cookie-cutter town house into a personalized haven. Tiffany was surrounded by a blank canvas. Luckily, her boyfriend, Julian Gaines, is a fine artist. “With all of the art, we want to evoke emotion and really let them be the highlight of our home,” she says. “Being with an artist is amazing because I have endless items to choose from.”

“For the dining room art, Julian imagined himself being next in line on his way to heaven and seeing the person in front of him receiving his halo,” she says. The table is from Lillian August, and the surrounding chairs are from Design Within Reach. The Studio Eero Aarnio Mini Pony Chair in the corner was found at Finnish Design Shop.
“For the dining room art, Julian imagined himself being next in line on his way to heaven and seeing the person in front of him receiving his halo,” she says. The table is from Lillian

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Detroit Pistons owner and Platinum Equity Tom Gores stepped down from the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) Board of Trustees on Thursday night, following pressure from activists over his investment firm’s ownership of a prison telephone company.

In 2017, Platinum Equity acquired Securus — a company that operates private telephone systems in all 50 states for more than a million prisoners. Gores’ involvement in the prison telecom industry has been met with criticism by various activists, and came to a head in September.

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Last month, two Civil Rights non-profit groups, Colors of Change and Worth Rises, penned a letter to the LACMA calling for Gores’ dismissal. The gesture spurred a second letter supporting Gores’ dismissal that was signed by more than 200 artists and art supporters, some of whom have ties to the museum.

“Today, the board of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art made it clear that there is no seat at the table for prison profiteers,” Rashad Robinson, president of Color Of Change, said in a statement. “Thanks to this coordinated campaign, Tom Gores was finally removed from LACMA’s Board of Trustees as a result of his dealings in the prison industry. As owner of Securus, Gores has exploited incarcerated people and their families — who are overwhelmingly Black and low-income — with exorbitant fees for prison phone calls. We applaud this resignation, but in order to truly see justice done, Congress must act and approve the Martha Wright

Chris Noble couldn’t stay retired long.

It was only six weeks into retirement when she starting working for one of Houston’s breast imaging centers, The Rose, as what she calls a “friend-raiser.”

But when Houston was required to quarantine earlier this year due to COVID-19, Noble’s ability to raise money for The Rose at public events became almost nonexistent.

That’s when she started painting.

“I started painting these pictures of women and as I started painting, I started adding bling and sparkles and that sort of stuff,” said Noble. “They turned out pretty fabulous.”


Noble began selling her paintings on social media for $250 each, or the cost of a mammogram, said Noble.

Her concept’s theme is Buy a Girl, Save a Girl and all the proceeds from the paintings go directly to The Rose to help aid its mission of helping patients receive breast cancer treatment.

As The Rose enters Breast Cancer Awareness Month, it’s hoping to serve as many patients as possible, insured or not. When patients with insurance pay to get a mammogram at The Rose, they also help pay for someone who is uninsured.

Noble hopes her art will be able to help patients as well, already raising enough money for 15 mammograms. Noble has painted over 150 pieces since May.

“So many women, so many families need help,” said Noble. “The Rose is needed more than ever before because so many women are not going to have health insurance.”

Noble owned her own IT company for 25 years before retiring in 2013. An extrovert at heart, her outgoing nature allowed her to continue working and volunteering as much as she could.

“I have been a patient for The Rose for many years, and I knew I