CLEVELAND, Ohio – A developer plan to add 30 new apartments in two buildings on both sides of an inclined industrial road on the southern end of the Duck Island section of Cleveland’s Tremont neighborhood.

The “Cooper Flats” buildings will include 18 apartments in one building on one side of Willey Avenue, with 12 additional units in a building across the road. The winding industrial roadway, which also includes the Fairmount Creamery building and Cleveland Animal Protective League to the northeast, is one of several ways residents can travel between Duck Island and what many consider the main section of Tremont.

Developer Matt Berges, who has built housing throughout Duck Island, sees the cluster of apartments as an opportunity to better connect the area to the rest of Tremont .

“It’s helping to link our efforts in Duck Island down to the connection point in Tremont,” he said.

He hopes to break ground next year and have the units available for leasing by 2022. Berges owns one of the parcels, while the Cleveland Land Bank owns the other. Some of the units will be affordable housing, while others will be market rate, and Berges said he envisions the 536-square-foot units to rent for between $850 and $1,100 a month.

The ground floor units are set to have small patios, while the larger building is designed to have an opening so residents and guests can walk under it toward the back.

Architect Westleigh Harper presented the plans Friday to the Cleveland City Planning Commission. Commission members unanimously approved the designs for the plans. The project stills need final approval before construction can begin.

Commission members seemed to embrace the idea, though. Chairman David Bowen called the project “very exciting,” while commission member Charles Slife, the councilman for Ward 17, praised the

SAN FRANCISCO — A California man convicted five years ago of defrauding several local governments in the state has been charged with trying to steal $22 million from the Paycheck Protection Program.

Attila Colar, 48, of Richmond, who goes by several aliases including Dahood Sharieff Bey, was charged with bank fraud in an alleged scheme where he falsified documents to take advantage of the federal program intended to keep small businesses afloat during the coronavirus pandemic, the U.S. Attorney’s Office in San Francisco said Friday.

Colar faces up to 30 years in prison and a $1 million fine if convicted.

Prosecutors sought to keep him detained in jail while the case is prosecuted by telling the court that Colar tried to destroy records related to PPP applications by flushing them down the toilet when investigators executed a search warrant at his home in Hercules.

According to a criminal complaint, he submitted nine loan applications, including three for All Hands on Deck, a nonprofit he founded to offer services to people released from jail or prison, and received $1.1 million from one of those applications. Prosecutors said he falsified payroll tax documents to make it look like he was paying employees in excess of $22 million, when there were no W2 forms to back up the claim.

None of the loan money was spent, defense attorney Patrick Hanly wrote in a motion arguing for Colar’s release.

“This is a no loss paper crime. A fraud case involving allegations of false statements on a loan application,” Hanly wrote. “The loan proceeds sat in the defendant’s account for over 2 weeks before being seized by the FBI.”

The East Bay Times reports Colar was the leader of a Black Muslim temple in Oakland and a group that was a spinoff of Your Black

JACKSON COUNTY, MI – Hail, lightening and rain hasn’t stopped employees on strike at manufacturers in Jackson and Calhoun counties, who are asking to keep their pension and days off for doctor visits.

Nineteen employees at Miller Tool & Die in Jackson have been on strike since Sept. 17, and 35 employees at Albion Casters have been on strike since Sept. 25. Striking workers are all part of International Association of Machinists Local 435.

Both factories have employees outside 24/7, through rain, hail, wind and low overnight temperatures. It’s the first strike in more than 28 years for both.

“It’s been cold, and it’s been wet,” Local 435 President Jamie Miller said Friday, Oct. 2. Miller is an employee at Miller Tool & Die and has no affiliation with the company owners.

Employees go on strike at Jackson factory: ‘We want our pension’

Employees at Albion Casters, 800 N. Clark St., worked throughout the shutdown at the start of the coronavirus pandemic because they were deemed essential workers, employee Benjamin Speer said. They received a $2-an-hour hazard pay raise until July, but it’s unclear why that stopped since the pandemic is ongoing, Speer said.

“After being told we were critical, essential workers, it was a kick in the gut,” employee Don Collins said.

During negotiations, Albion Casters owner, Colson Group USA, wanted to cut the number of unpaid days for doctor’s visits from four to two and mandate overtime on Saturdays and possibly holidays, Speer said. That would mean employees work 56 hours a week instead of 48.

Colson Group USA did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

Reducing the number of unpaid days employees can take for doctor’s visits doesn’t make sense, especially because of the COVID-19 pandemic, Collins said. He said management told employees they needed to

He started as a cook in the Michelin-starred Antonio Restaurant, and then quickly rose through the ranks to become head chef in just three years. “The opportunities are definitely better in Macau as many hotels, casinos and resorts have opened here,” said the 31-year-old.

Last year, he was the given the task of opening Paulaner Brahaus, a franchised German restaurant in the former Portuguese colony. Tavares was on track to open in late January when the Covid-19 outbreak in China brought tourism to a standstill, disrupting plans and pushing back the opening of the 150-seat outlet by nearly a year to December.

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Tavares’ predicament and those linked to the city’s tourism industry show that Macau’s reliance on gaming, tourism and affiliated services is hurting its economy as it accounted for 70 per cent of its revenues in the first eight months of this year.

Macau needs to move quickly to diversify its economy to provide new job opportunities and income sources for its growing population, especially in light of the havoc wrecked to its mainstay tourism industry by the coronavirus pandemic, say analysts and veteran businessmen.

Just before the Covid-19 pandemic derailed the city’s economy, Beijing announced a raft of policies in December last year aimed at diversifying Macau’s economy and forging closer integration with the Greater Bay Area by building its financial services industry, while maintaining its position as a leading gaming and tourism centre.

President Xi Jinping, during his three-day visit to Macau in December last year to mark the 20th anniversary of its return from Portuguese to Chinese rule, backed the city to develop into a service platform for commercial and trade cooperation between China and Portuguese-speaking countries. Xi