Mayor Lori Lightfoot on Thursday touted $500,000 the city’s getting from restaurant delivery company DoorDash to winterize Chicago restaurants, while proposals by aldermen to further crack down on such apps during the coronavirus pandemic languish in City Council committees.



Erica Hunt et al. posing for the camera: Mayor Lori Lightfoot visits Camp DoorDash at the 2019 Taste of Chicago in Grant Park.


© Zbigniew Bzdak / Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
Mayor Lori Lightfoot visits Camp DoorDash at the 2019 Taste of Chicago in Grant Park.

In announcing the grant from the delivery company to help restaurants prepare for winter, Lightfoot thanked DoorDash “for investing in Chicago and its restaurants to assist them in continuing to serve Chicagoans this winter.”

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Third-party apps such as DoorDash, Grubhub and Uber Eats that charge additional fees to restaurants to deliver meals have drawn increasing scrutiny from elected officials since the virus outbreak began, as diners skittish about eating inside restaurants have been ordering more to-go meals, fueling a boom for the companies.

During a May City Council committee hearing, struggling restaurateurs said the companies charge 30% or more to deliver food, and sometimes set up their own websites masquerading as those of the restaurants themselves.

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Northwest Side Ald. Scott Waguespack, 32nd, introduced an ordinance to cap fees at 5% of the cost of the meal, but it got shunted to the City Council Rules Committee, where ideas the mayor opposes often get sent to die.

And while the council did adopt Lightfoot-backed rules requiring delivery apps to itemize the fees they charge, stricter bench marks backed by downtown Ald. Brendan Reilly, 42nd, have gone nowhere.

Reilly on Thursday said if the city wanted to really throw a lifeline to struggling restaurants, it would adopt the tougher standards, and the companies would readily agree to abide by them.

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(Bloomberg) — The Trump administration’s potential restrictions on two Chinese payments giants would reverberate far beyond politics, potentially affecting multibillion-dollar deals, shaking up international commerce and even shaping the evolution of the global financial system.



a person sitting on display in a store: An advertisement for Tencent Holdings Ltd.'s WeChat Pay digital payment service is displayed outside a restaurant in Hong Kong, China, on Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2020. WeChat Pay and Ant Group's Alipay account for the majority of the mobile payments transactions in China.


© Bloomberg
An advertisement for Tencent Holdings Ltd.’s WeChat Pay digital payment service is displayed outside a restaurant in Hong Kong, China, on Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2020. WeChat Pay and Ant Group’s Alipay account for the majority of the mobile payments transactions in China.

U.S. officials have stepped up behind-the-scenes talks in recent weeks about possibly restricting the expansion of Ant Group’s Alipay and Tencent Holdings Ltd.’s WeChat Pay over concerns that the digital payment platforms threaten national security, Bloomberg reported on Wednesday.

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Read more: U.S. explores curbs on Ant Group, Tencent payment systems

If the administration proceeds, the most immediate hit would be to Ant Group’s plan for a stock listing in Shanghai and Hong Kong, a deal that could rank as the world’s largest initial public offering. Some international companies have been working with the payment apps and could see those strategies hurt or derailed. And while restrictions may ultimately head off potent competitors to U.S. and European banks, it could also — depending on how China responds — thwart their own planned expansion into the world’s second-largest economy.

Here’s a breakdown of the many companies with business at stake as President Donald Trump’s administration weighs its decision:

Ant’s IPO

Investors have been eager to pile into Jack Ma’s Ant Group. After gauging early interest, the company is seeking to raise at least $35 billion in its IPO, people familiar with the matter have said, potentially topping Saudi Aramco’s record $29 billion sale. Ant lifted the target based on an increased valuation of about $250 billion, which would exceed the market