SINGAPORE – The safe-haven dollar and yen nursed losses on Thursday, after the revival of hopes for some U.S. spending improved investor sentiment and appetite for riskier currencies.

A flurry of late-Tuesday tweets from President Donald Trump, after he canceled talks with Democrats over coronavirus relief, suggested he was open to piecemeal spending measures.

That lifted equity markets and commodity currencies and sank the safe-haven yen to a three-week low of 106.11 per dollar overnight. The dollar was weaker on most other majors.PELOSI: ALL TRUMP WANTED IN CORONAVIRUS RELIEF NEGOTIATIONS WAS ‘TO SEND OUT A CHECK WITH HIS NAME ON IT’

The euro edged up 0.2% to $1.1767 and held there early in the Asia session. The risk-sensitive Australian dollar lifted off a one-week low and rose about 0.5% overnight to hold at $0.7137 in Asia. [AUD/]

With no fresh clues on stimulus, morning moves were slight and leaned in favor of the greenback. The New Zealand dollar slipped 0.4% after a central bank official said the bank was “actively working” on negative rates.

People wearing face masks walk past a bank’s electronic board showing the Hong Kong share index at Hong Kong Stock Exchange Monday, Sept. 21, 2020. (Associated Press)

Top White House officials have played down the likelihood that anything gets passed, but House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is pursuing a standalone bill for aid to airlines.

“It looks like they still can’t agree on a bigger package,” said Commonwealth Bank of Australia currency analyst Joe Capurso. “If they could get an agreement on that, you’d get a bit more of a reaction and the U.S. dollar would fall.”

The overnight mood had been further supported by hints at even more

By Olga Cotaga

LONDON, Oct 6 (Reuters)The dollar was on the defensive against most currencies on Tuesday as rising optimism that U.S. lawmakers could agree on new stimulus to blunt the economic impact of the coronavirus dampened demand for safer assets.

Risk appetite also improved after U.S. President Donald Trump left hospital and returned to the White House following treatment for COVID-19, a development viewed as reducing political uncertainties in the near term.

The lead taken by Trump’s presidential opponent Joe Biden in electoral polls ahead of next month’s election is also seen as negative for the U.S. currency.

“The increasing possibility of a “blue wave” (Democrat control of the White House and Congress) that would open the door for much-needed fiscal stimulus would be a welcome development for risk assets and could undermine the U.S. dollar,” said Lee Hardman, currency analyst at MUFG.

An index which measures the dollar against a basket of currencies was down slightly at 93.39 =USD. It has fallen 1.2% from a two-month high reached at the end of September, in contrast with U.S. equity markets, which rose.

Euro/dollar was trading up 0.1% at 1.1792 EUR=EBS.

The British pound also rose 0.1%, to $1.2991 GBP=D3, with hopes that a Brexit deal can be reached pushing the currency towards $1.30.

The dollar was 0.1% weaker versus the Japanese yen at 105.65 JPY=EBS.

U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin spoke by phone for about an hour on Monday on coronavirus economic relief and were preparing to talk again on Tuesday, continuing their recent flurry of activity working towards a deal on legislation.

White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows said there was still potential for an agreement among lawmakers in Washington on more economic relief,

(Bloomberg) — South Africa plans to tap global appetite for green bonds to help fund an infrastructure program worth as much as 2.3 trillion rand ($135 billion) over the next decade.



a view of a city: A construction worker looks out towards the Central Business District (CBD) on the city skyline from inside The Leonardo, the Legacy Group’s mixed-use property development, currently Africa’s tallest building, in the Sandton district of Johannesburg, South Africa, on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2019. Emerging markets will again be looking to central banks to provide the next leg-up in a rally that’s making it the best September so far for stocks and currencies since 2013.


© Bloomberg
A construction worker looks out towards the Central Business District (CBD) on the city skyline from inside The Leonardo, the Legacy Group’s mixed-use property development, currently Africa’s tallest building, in the Sandton district of Johannesburg, South Africa, on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2019. Emerging markets will again be looking to central banks to provide the next leg-up in a rally that’s making it the best September so far for stocks and currencies since 2013.

Winning over the private sector and streamlining the project-approval process will be key to the drive, launched by President Cyril Ramaphosa in June to revive an economy that was already in recession before the coronavirus struck and is expected to contract by the most in nine decades this year. In July, 62 priority projects were announced in the first stage of the program.

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“There is a shortage of 140 billion rand in phase one, and a large part of that will come from green bonds,” said Patricia de Lille, the minister in charge of the public works department that’s overseeing the program. “We can’t just be a government of announcements and sod turnings.”

South Africa faces backlogs in everything from power plants to broadband services and housing. While the government has traditionally funded most infrastructure, its coffers are empty, and it’s looking to tap the about 12 trillion rand that the country’s business organizations estimate is the total of savings and bank assets.

For more on the launch of the program, click here

“It’s not that the private sector doesn’t want to invest in infrastructure projects,” said Leon Campher, the chief executive