The coronavirus pandemic stopped work for nearly a month at the California farm where Luis earns $80 a day picking tomatoes, but that didn’t stop him from sending $800 to family in Mexico.

The money had traveled far by the time he was back at work in June. It kept his family fed, funded his father’s hernia operation and paid for other medical expenses.

Early in the pandemic, experts predicted that migrant workers in the U.S. like 32-year-old Luis — who didn’t want his last name used for fear of losing his job and being deported — would wire home less money as the virus hammered the American economy. But those predictions didn’t materialize for workers from Mexico, who have sent home huge amounts of money, called remittances.

In August, their payments amounted to $3.57 billion, according to the Bank of Mexico, the second-highest level on record for a single month and 5.3% above August 2019. Payments in the first eight months of 2020 ballooned to $26.4 billion, up 9.4% compared with the same period last year.

The enormous sums of money moving south, most through electronic transfers, have puzzled some economists, who say their original forecasts underestimated the strength of “human networks” between Mexican migrants in the U.S. and their families back home. They also say the rise has been driven by a weakened Mexican peso and the $600-a-week U.S. unemployment benefit that expired at the end of July. Despite that, the surge continued in August.

“We are honestly very surprised at their resilience,” Jonathan Fortun, an economist at the Institute of International Finance in Washington, said about the payments.

Money coming from families in the U.S. has long been a lifeline in Mexico. The payments are critical to low-income families for expenses like food and clothing. They also

PHOENIX (AP) — The coronavirus pandemic stopped work for nearly a month at the California farm where Luis earns $80 a day picking tomatoes, but that didn’t stop him from sending $800 to family in Mexico.

The money had traveled far by the time he was back at work in June. It kept his family fed, funded his father’s hernia operation and paid for other medical expenses.

Early in the pandemic, experts predicted that migrant workers in the U.S. like 32-year-old Luis — who didn’t want his last name used for fear of losing his job and being deported — would wire home less money as the virus hammered the American economy. But those predictions didn’t materialize for workers from Mexico, who have sent home huge amounts of money, called remittances.

In August, their payments amounted to $3.57 billion, according to the Bank of Mexico, the second-highest level on record for a single month and 5.3% above August 2019. Payments in the first eight months of 2020 ballooned to $26.4 billion, up 9.4% compared with the same period last year.

The enormous sums of money moving south, most through electronic transfers, have puzzled some economists, who say their original forecasts underestimated the strength of “human networks” between Mexican migrants in the U.S. and their families back home. They also say the rise has been driven by a weakened Mexican peso and the $600-a-week U.S. unemployment benefit that expired at the end of July. Despite that, the surge continued in August.

“We are honestly very surprised at their resilience,” Jonathan Fortun, an economist at the Institute of International Finance in Washington, said about the payments.

Money coming from families in the U.S. has long been a lifeline in Mexico. The payments are critical to low-income families for expenses like food and

Boston Celtics v Miami Heat - Game Four
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The midseason hiatus and subsequent Orlando bubble as a response to COVID-19 has changed almost everything about this NBA season, but it has had a notable impact on gamblers. Bettors that had futures stakes in some of the best teams in the NBA saw their money go up in flames when groups like the Milwaukee Bucks and Los Angeles Clippers couldn’t adjust to bubble ball. The Miami Heat, meanwhile, have rewarded the faith that bettors put in them with one of the more surprising runs to the Finals in recent NBA history. 

The numbers on some of the earlier bets placed on the Heat, according to William Hill Sportsbook, are stark. Here are the some of the craziest bets they took: 

  • $200 on the Heat at 200-to-1 to win the title ($40,200 payout). 
  • $600 on the Heat at 75-to-1 to win the title ($45,600 payout). 
  • $2,000 on the Heat at 40-to-1 to win the title ($82,000 payout). 

Now, it should be noted that these odds changed drastically over time. When 2020 championship odds were first released, the Heat were in cap hell and hadn’t yet acquired Jimmy Butler. As unbelievable as it seems, there was a moment in which a 2020 Heat championship seemed practically impossible. As the season went on, their odds steadily improved. First, they got Butler, then Bam Adebayo became an All-Star, and by midseason, they’d established themselves as fringe contenders. 

The Lakers, even at their worst, never had such low odds. The mere presence of LeBron James ensured that they’d be in the championship conversation even after missing the 2019 playoffs. Vegas always believed that he’d find a superstar teammate with the Lakers, but before he did, there was still a bit of value to be found. One William Hill Sportsbook bettor, for