Free money alert! Well, free money, when you spend money. But you were already shopping anyway, so might as well collect $10 while you’re at it.

For Prime Day, Prime members will get a $10 promotional credit when they purchase an Amazon gift card of $40 or more. That also includes newly-launched Amazon Video eGift Cards (available on the mobile app), as well as people who are reloading their current Amazon gift cards.

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This should be your first Prime Day purchase. Amazon gift cards will be emailed to you immediately and can be used straight away. Last year, Amazon did the same thing (it’s $5 more this year!!), and the promotional credit came through quickly as well. So, you can use the gift card for your first product purchase of Prime day, and hopefully, the promotional credit for your 2nd purchase of Prime Day.

This is a limited-time offer and only while supplies last. It is limited to one

With millions of Americans still sheltering in place and cooking their own meals, the grocery industry has been one of the few bright spots in an otherwise battered U.S. economy. Unless, that is, you are Whole Foods Market, the upscale chain acquired three years ago by Amazon.com.

Trips to Whole Foods in September were down 25% from a year earlier, according to Placer.ai, which tallies retail foot traffic from some 30 million mobile devices. Some of the decline is due to consumers consolidating shopping trips and buying more groceries online, but the traffic decline at Whole Foods is much steeper than at Walmart, Kroger and Trader Joe’s. Visits to Albertsons-owned stores, including Safeway, meanwhile, actually increased last month, compared with a year ago. And though Earnest Research estimates that Whole Foods sales (including online) rose by as much as 10% during the pandemic, some rivals are posting twice the gains.

“Everyone is buying more everywhere, but total customers are actually down for Whole Foods,” said Michael Maloof, who tracks consumer habits for Earnest Research. “Whole Foods is in a uniquely horrible place.”

Amazon doesn’t break out Whole Foods sales, so getting a complete picture of the chain’s travails is difficult. But few grocers were more awkwardly positioned for the pandemic, analysts say. The stores were rarely a one-stop destination before the outbreak even for fans. The company expanded its prepared meals sections for office workers seeking lunch or dinner on the go, but now those customers are homebound. And Whole Foods shoppers who have time to visit stores often confront long lines and aisles crowded with gig workers paid to fetch online orders.

Meanwhile, despite expectations that the world’s largest e-commerce company would use Whole Foods to re-invent food shopping, Amazon has opted to open a separate chain called Amazon



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US online retailer Amazon.Com Inc has slapped a legal notice on Future Group, alleging that the retailer’s Rs 24,713 crore asset sale to Reliance Industries violated an agreement with the e-commerce giant.

“We have initiated steps to enforce our contractual rights,” a spokesperson for the Seattle-based e-commerce giant said. “As the matter is sub-judice, we can’t provide details.”

Amazon last year bought a 49 per cent stake in one of Future’s unlisted firms, Future Coupons Ltd, with the right to buy into flagship Future Retail after a period between 3 and 10 years. Future Coupons owns a 7.3 per cent stake in Future Retail.

In August this year, Future reached an agreement to sell its retail, wholesale, logistics and warehousing units to Reliance.

The deal is awaiting regulatory approvals.

A source who is advising Future Group in this matter told PTI that Future Coupons received the notice from Amazon.

The person added that the Kishore Biyani-led group intends to settle this matter amicably, either through mediation or arbitration.

E-mail send to Reliance Industries Ltd (RIL) and Future Group did not solicit any response.

The development comes at a time when Reliance Retail Ventures Ltd – run by India’s richest man Mukesh Ambani – has been on a fund raising spree, bringing in well over Rs 37,700 crore in less than four weeks from global investors including Silver Lake, KKR, General Atlantic, Mubadala, GIC, TPG and ADIA.

Reliance Retail’s network spans supermarkets, consumer electronics chain stores, cash and carry wholesale business, fast-fashion outlets and online grocery store, JioMart. It has a presence in nearly 7,000 towns, with 640 million footfalls across core categories of grocery, consumer electronics and apparel.

The investments equip Reliance Retail with funds to compete in both offline and online formats. The investments



a man sitting at a desk: Amazon expanded its Personal Shopper by Prime Wardrobe service to include men's clothing. Amazon


© Amazon
Amazon expanded its Personal Shopper by Prime Wardrobe service to include men’s clothing. Amazon

  • Amazon announced an expansion to its Personal Shopper by Prime Wardrobe service, leading many to wonder about the impact it will have on Stitch Fix. 
  • “Obviously, whenever Amazon does anything in retail, we all pay really close attention, and apparel has been a strategic focus of theirs for a long time,” Ed Yruma, managing director at KeyBanc Capital Markets, told Business Insider. 
  • But analysts said that Stitch Fix is still well-positioned to benefit from the wave of bankruptcies that have plagued retail this year, among other factors.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Last week, Amazon expanded its Personal Shopper by Prime Wardrobe offerings to include men’s clothing. 

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For $4.99 a month, members receive shipments of clothing that are curated based on their style and fit preferences. Personal Shopper was first launched for women’s clothing in July 2019. According to an Amazon spokesperson, “hundreds of thousands” of people have since set up profiles for Personal Shopper. 

The news that Amazon was expanding the service set off alarm bells for many wondering whether it would spell doom for Stitch Fix, the publicly traded personal styling tech company.

Stitch Fix’s primary line of business is its “Fixes,” which are boxes of items selected for male and female shoppers by stylists using data on users’ personal style and fit. 

But analysts say that Amazon’s growth into this category won’t hurt Stitch Fix too much — not any more than Amazon’s usual innovations do, at least. 

“Obviously, whenever Amazon does anything in retail, we all pay really close attention, and apparel has been a strategic focus of theirs for a long time,” Ed Yruma, managing director at KeyBanc Capital Markets, told Business Insider. 

Yruma said



a person sitting on a table: As of this week, the platform is officially expanding its purview to include men’s fashion.


© Hearst Owned
As of this week, the platform is officially expanding its purview to include men’s fashion.

By now we’ve established that you’re a pretty stylish dude. We can be honest here, right? We know each other pretty well at this point. So I’ll let you in on a little secret. Sometimes *lowers voice conspiratorially* being a pretty stylish dude is tough work. Sometimes, in fact, being a pretty stylish dude can damn-near feel like a burden.

For those times, few and far between though they may be, it’s handy to have some backup around. And if the burden of being a stylish dude has been feeling particularly heavy as of late, backup is indeed here in the form of Amazon’s brand-spanking-new (for men, that is) personal shopping service.

If I had to hazard a guess, I’d say you’re probably not doing too much of your clothing shopping on the world’s largest retailer. Well, Amazon’s personal shopping service is looking to change all that, and I’ll be damned if it’s not making a compelling argument right out of the gate. Billed as Personal Shopper by Prime Wardrobe (whew), the monthly styling service exclusively available to Prime members initially launched last year featuring an enviable roster of go-to women’s brands. As of this week, the platform is officially expanding its purview to include men’s fashion from the likes of Adidas, Carhartt, Lacoste, Levi’s, and the retailer’s own impressive—if slightly shadowy—cabal of in-house labels. (I’m kidding, I’m kidding! Mr. Bezos, please call off your drones. The buzzing is really starting to annoy my neighbors.)



a bag of luggage sitting on top of a suitcase: Personal Shopper by Prime Wardrobe includes staples and statement pieces alike from brands big and small.


© Amazon Prime
Personal Shopper by Prime Wardrobe includes staples and statement pieces alike from brands big and small.

With the launch of a personal shopping service for men, Amazon looks to plant its flag firmly