Happy Monday and welcome back to On The Money. I’m Sylvan Lane, and here’s your nightly guide to everything affecting your bills, bank account and bottom line.

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THE BIG DEAL—Trump faces unusual barrier to COVID-19 aid: President TrumpDonald John TrumpDes Moines mayor says he’s worried about coronavirus spread at Trump rally Judiciary Committee Democrats pen second letter to DOJ over Barrett disclosures: ‘raises more questions that it answers’ Trump asks campaign to schedule daily events for him until election: report MORE‘s last-ditch effort to secure another enormous package of emergency coronavirus relief is being threatened by an unusual group: his GOP allies in Congress.

For almost four years, Republican leaders have rallied behind the president on issues as varied as health care, immigration, trade and defense, even when his positions bucked long-held conservative doctrines.

Yet just weeks before the Nov. 3 election, as the embattled president is exhorting Congress to move a major package of COVID-19 aid, those same lawmakers have emerged as the single greatest barrier standing in his way. The Hill’s Mike Lillis and Scott Wong tell us why here.

Republican resistance: 

The politics: The resistance comes at a crucial point in the presidential campaign, when Trump is recovering from his own bout with COVID-19, trailing badly in the polls and all but pleading with Republican leaders to “go big” with a late-cycle lifeline to promote on the trail.

“I would like to see a bigger stimulus package, frankly, than either the Democrats or

Happy Monday and welcome back to On The Money. I’m Sylvan Lane, and here’s your nightly guide to everything affecting your bills, bank account and bottom line.



a person wearing a suit and tie: On The Money: Trump faces unusual barrier to COVID-19 aid in GOP allies | Advocates plead for housing aid as eviction cliff looms


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On The Money: Trump faces unusual barrier to COVID-19 aid in GOP allies | Advocates plead for housing aid as eviction cliff looms

See something I missed? Let me know at slane@thehill.com or tweet me @SylvanLane. And if you like your newsletter, you can subscribe to it here: http://bit.ly/1NxxW2N.

Write us with tips, suggestions and news: slane@thehill.com, njagoda@thehill.com and nelis@thehill.com. Follow us on Twitter: @SylvanLane, @NJagoda and @NivElis.

THE BIG DEAL-Trump faces unusual barrier to COVID-19 aid: President Trump’s last-ditch effort to secure another enormous package of emergency coronavirus relief is being threatened by an unusual group: his GOP allies in Congress.

For almost four years, Republican leaders have rallied behind the president on issues as varied as health care, immigration, trade and defense, even when his positions bucked long-held conservative doctrines.

Yet just weeks before the Nov. 3 election, as the embattled president is exhorting Congress to move a major package of COVID-19 aid, those same lawmakers have emerged as the single greatest barrier standing in his way. The Hill’s Mike Lillis and Scott Wong tell us why here.

Republican resistance:

  • Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) has repeatedly thrown cold water on the idea of spending trillions more dollars to fight the pandemic, citing the opposition of roughly 20 Republicans in the upper chamber.
  • On a conference call Saturday, Senate Republicans voiced concerns to party leaders about the $1.8 trillion package proposed by the White House a day earlier.
  • The backlash ensured that the only path to passage is on the shoulders of Democratic votes – a strategy McConnell

A unit of Chevron CVX announced a partnership with the waste management firm, Brightmark Energy, to manufacture and market dairy biomethane, which is a type of a renewable natural gas (“RNG”), containing methane emissions. The drive comes as fossil-fuel manufacturers are under intense pressure to lower greenhouse gas emissions to mitigate climate change.

The joint venture will provide funds for the infrastructural developments and commercial transactions of dairy biomethane projects in multiple states of the United States. Chevron will purchase the natural gas produced from these projects to market as transportation fuel. The natural gas is made from emissions from cattle burps. During the digestive process, sheep and cattle release methane, which is used to produce RNG for vehicles.

Chevron’s objective is to improve the development process of reliable and affordable energy and to invest in companies addressing greenhouse gas emissions as stated by Andy Walz, president of Americas Products for Chevron. Currently, the company is working on advancing the use of renewables, making targeted investments and establishing partnerships in emerging sources of energy.

On its part, Brightmark is planning to attain a global net-zero carbon future. Importantly, the company organizes lifecycle carbon-negative projects all over the world to improve ecological health with significantly less waste and for economical advancement.

About Chevron & Price Performance

Chevron, headquartered in San Ramon, CA, is one of the largest publicly traded oil and gas companies in the world, with operations in almost every corner of the globe. Its shares have outperformed the Zacks Oil & Gas Integrated industry in the past 6 months. Shares of Chevron have lost 12.8% compared with the 19.6% decline of the composite stocks belonging to the industry.

 

 

Zacks Rank & Key Picks

The company currently carries a Zack Rank #3 (Hold). Some better-ranked players in the energy space