Happy Tuesday and welcome back to On The Money. I’m Sylvan Lane, and here’s your nightly guide to everything affecting your bills, bank account and bottom line.



a man and a woman wearing a suit and tie: On The Money: Pelosi, citing 'leverage' over Trump, holds strong to $2.2T in COVID-19 aid | McConnell to force vote on 'targeted' relief bill next week | Trump again asks court to shield tax records


© Greg Nash
On The Money: Pelosi, citing ‘leverage’ over Trump, holds strong to $2.2T in COVID-19 aid | McConnell to force vote on ‘targeted’ relief bill next week | Trump again asks court to shield tax records

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THE BIG DEAL-Pelosi, citing ‘leverage’ over Trump, holds strong to $2.2T in COVID-19 aid: Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) on Tuesday shot down entreaties from some Democrats to cut a $1.8 trillion deal with the White House on coronavirus relief, arguing that President Trump’s pleas for Congress to “go big” have given her leverage to hold out for more aid.

“I appreciate the, shall we say, a couple people saying, ‘Take it, take it, take it,'” Pelosi said in a phone conference with Democrats, according to source on the call. “Take it? Take it? Even the president is saying, ‘Go big or go home.'”

  • Pelosi and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin have been in near-daily talks in search of an elusive stimulus agreement, even as the prospect of a deal before the Nov. 3 elections has faded.
  • Mnuchin last week had offered a $1.8 trillion package, up from an earlier proposal of $1.6 trillion, prompting a growing number of House Democrats to urge the Speaker to come down from her $2.2 trillion proposal.
  • That figure was already a reduction from the Democrats’ $3.4

Happy Friday and welcome back to On The Money. I’m Sylvan Lane, and here’s your nightly guide to everything affecting your bills, bank account and bottom line.



a person standing in front of a blue bench: On The Money: Economy adds 661K jobs in final report before Election Day | House approves $2.2T COVID-19 relief bill as White House talks stall | Stand-alone bill to provide relief for airlines blocked on House floor


© Getty Images
On The Money: Economy adds 661K jobs in final report before Election Day | House approves $2.2T COVID-19 relief bill as White House talks stall | Stand-alone bill to provide relief for airlines blocked on House floor

See something I missed? Let me know at [email protected] or tweet me @SylvanLane. And if you like your newsletter, you can subscribe to it here: http://bit.ly/1NxxW2N.

Write us with tips, suggestions and news: [email protected], [email protected] and [email protected]. Follow us on Twitter: @SylvanLane, @NJagoda and @NivElis.

THE BIG DEAL-Economy adds 661K jobs in final jobs report before Election Day: The U.S. gained 661,000 jobs in September, the Labor Department reported Friday in the final jobs report before Election Day.

The unemployment rate fell to 7.9 percent in September as the U.S. posted its fifth consecutive month of job gains after the onset of the coronavirus pandemic triggered the deepest and quickest economic contraction since the Great Depression.

The report, however, came in well below the projections of economists and contained several red flags about the strength of the recovery from the coronavirus recession.

  • September marked the fourth consecutive month of declining job gains after additions of 4.7 million in June, 1.7 million in July and 1.5 million in August, according to revised figures released Friday.
  • Economists had expected the U.S. to gain roughly 800,000 jobs in September to push the unemployment rate down to roughly 8.2 percent from 8.4 percent in August.
  • While the jobless rate fell below that level, the labor force participation rate – the percentage of potential workers seeking jobs – fell